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37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79
Page 75
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Seacon. 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 75. August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 18, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/414.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon. (August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979). 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 75. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/414

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon, 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 75, August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 18, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/414.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79
Creator (Local)
  • Seacon
Date August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979
Description Information regarding the guests of honor for Seacon '79.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Shaw, Bob
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Seacon
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Brighton, England
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
  • documents (object genre)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 29
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5301
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 75
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f029_068_077.jpg
Transcript LARRY NIVEN I last saw Arthur Clarke on a TV screen, broadcasting direct from Sri Lanka, while Explorer I passed through Jupiter system. He was magnificent. He could persuade Senator Proxmire to support the space program, if that moron would listen. For the past twenty-odd years now, I've been reading everything Arthur Clarke was willing to write. Anything that any writer in the field can do, Arthur Clarke can do it as well or better. But the thing he does best is something I've been trying to learn ever since I started writing. He tells of big things . . . well, we all tell of big things. But Clarke can make you feel it. He writes of cities ancient beyond imagination - and makes the reader's imagination capable of grasping it. He tells of geological ages passing, and makes you see it. Will you ever forget that moment in CHILDHOOD'S END, in the museum of the Overlords, when Jan Rodricks looked down upon a single gigantic eye? Or the rows of skyscraper-sized pillars on the Earth's Moon in THE CITY AND THE STARS. Their purpose is unguessable, until Alvin finds two pillars broken outward. It's a cage . . . Remember the lights coming on in Rama? Rama was big enough to stretch anyone's imagination. But I remember a subtler work, a short story in which archeologists worked to uncover the tracks of a Tyrannosaurus Rex. Engineers nearby were building a machine that they said would look into the tyrant lizard's past. The dinosaur's tracks grew wider and wider as they dug; it had been bounding in pursuit of a fleeing prey. The machine was about to be tested . . . and finally the tracks of the prey appeared: a zigzag pattern of tires from the engineers' jeep. And I remember a feghoot, NEUTRON TIDE. It was a reference to two of my own stories . . . and it appeared some months after Arthur Clarke told me he was a Niven fan. I knew I had arrived then. Oh, boy, did that make me feel good. and neglected, sf. I have both admiration and love for a number of British editors, like John Bush and the late Ted Carnell, both dear friends as well as brilliant professionals. And the number of British sf writers in my private pantheon is immense, from H. G. Wells, unquestionably the father of us all, to Brian Aldiss, by way of John Brunner, Anthony Burgess, Arthur Clarke, Aldous Huxley, Kingsley Amis, W. Olaf Stapledon, S. Fowler Wright and any number of others. Every one of them has a certifiable claim to be at the top of any list. But there is one more, and I think he is the one whose absence in my life might have left the biggest gap. Curiously I met him only once. The name he was best known by was John Wyndham. For about a decade, while he was writing such marvellous books as The Day of the Triff ids and The Midwich Cuckoos, he was as close a friend as one can have by correspondence. John's power of invention was great, and he was quite incapable of writing a bad sentence. But what I liked most about him as a writer was the marvellous humanity in every line. He was often witty, but never unkind. There are writers who disappoint upon meeting in the flesh - maybe most writers do, because we all put the best of us down on paper and sometimes there is not enough left to bother with. Not John Wyndham. The person you can see behind the novels is the same person who lived in the real world, and when he left it a little over a decade ago it became much poorer. Frederik Pohl It's very hard to choose my' 'favourite" British science-fiction person, because there are so very many contenders. I grew up on British fantasies, like E. Nesbit's wonderful Five Children and It, and Rudyard Kipling's superb, CHRISTOPHER PRIEST For reasons of personal nostalgia: the novels of John Wyndham, especially KRAKEN, TRIFFIDS and CHRYSALIDS. I read Wyndham long before I had even heard of sf. Wyndham obeyed H. G. Wells's dictum, and domesticated the bizarre, describing it in the mellow cadences of BBC English. Being young, foolish and deeply entrenched in the middle classes I approved of all this, and was somewhat mortified to hear him described as a science fiction writer. However, years later, when I came across the hard stuff, I understood at last. AAy secret vice is en joying the novels of Charles Eric Maine. Maine is a neglected and apparently despised author, one whose work has been overtaken by trendy modern stuff. Unlike other writers of his period (he was prolific throughout the '50s and early '60s) he was not sufficiently established to keep an audience of his own, and most of his books are now out of print. Maine's books have a number of old-fashioned virtues: crisp, workmanlike characterizations, a considerable degree of narrative energy, and, best of all, lively and surprising plots that crackle like new cellophane. My favourites: TIME- LINER, HIGH VACUUM, CALCULATED RISK and THE TIDE WENT OUT. But the one British sf book I value above all others is NON-STOP by Brian Aldiss. This is partly for personal reasons (I read it at an impressionable age), butalso because it isa novel that has had, I think, an underground influence on the way our sf is written here and understood abroad. NONSTOP built a bridge. It was an American type of sf novel — written with all the vigour and dash of the best American authors — but it remained a quintessential^ British and personal book. Not Aldiss's best-written novel, nor his best all-round novel, it remains one of his most enjoyable and (gulp) exciting books. It gains stature with age and bears a number of re- readings. It has, to my knowledge, inspirited a large number of the writers who followed; Aldiss was showing the Brits how to be themselves in a popular and commercial genre. BOB SHAW The science fiction bug really got me when I was a boy during World War II and the sole supply of the stuff was one very slim British reprint of ASTOUNDING every second month. In those days the concepts of science fiction and America were intimately bound together in my mind, and it was with some surprise I learned that my all-time favourite story from ASTOUNDING's golden age had been written by a British author. That author was A. Bertram Chandler and the story was "Giant Killer", which appeared as the cover story on ASF's October 1945 edition. The thing which addicted me to science fiction was that most beautiful of sensations-the feeling of one's mind being stretched - and "Giant Killer" was a mind-stretcher if ever there was one. In those days simplistic notions about atomic radiation and mutants were exercising a powerful fascination over sf writers and readers, and Jack Chandler's story of mutated rats inhabiting the insulation of a starship was perfectly timed. The events are related from the point of view of the rats who - and this is what gave Chandler's story the status of a parable - although mutants themselves have conservative ideas about the degree of change that is socially acceptable, and one of their most 75