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37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79
Page 73
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Seacon. 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 73. August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 8, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/412.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon. (August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979). 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 73. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/412

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon, 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 73, August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 8, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/412.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79
Creator (Local)
  • Seacon
Date August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979
Description Information regarding the guests of honor for Seacon '79.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Shaw, Bob
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Seacon
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Brighton, England
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
  • documents (object genre)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 29
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5301
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 73
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f029_068_075.jpg
Transcript surely one aim of sf? The global overview of sf must question the intention of offshoots like 'English' sf and 'Jewish' sf and 'Russian' sf. Qualities vary, as is natural, and the intrinsic value of a richly diversified spectrum of cultures must not be confused with blind national pride. The oral traditions of jungle peoples praying to metal birds which drop food parcels to them is surely apposite. I suppose one of the great moments of sf for me comes at the end of the H. G. Wells' film 'Things to Come'. And we are to understand that there are much greater issues at stake than merely going out to the stars "Which is it to be, Passworthy? Which is it to be?" MY FAVOURITE SF WRITER by M. J. Moorcock (39) My favourite sf writer is J. G. Ballard. I like him because he combines exotic symbolism with psychological insight. He uses sophisticated and individualistic images to make an essentially moral investigation of some of our specific contemporary experiences. With William Burroughs, who shares Ballard's relish for twentieth century language but is by no means as disciplined and methodical a writer, he has been a seminal influence on much pre-70s fiction and poetry. Ballard has married form and content so that one reflects the other: and in this sense he is a 'poetic' writer. In recent years he has also refined his language, producing some of the most polished and concentrated prose we have in English. As a literary figure (rather than as an sf writer) he was in the vanguard of that fundamentally romantic renaissance which could be seen to have had its origins in the British sf magazines of the 50s and 60s but which has since given us a good deal of excellent novels and poetry. Among those who acknowledge this debt are Robert Nye, D. M. Thomas, George MacBeth, Giles Gordon, Brigid Brophy, Angus Wilson, Alan Burns, Angela Carter, and many others. Artists and musicians have frequently drawn inspiration from Ballard in particular and he is recognised abroad as one of our leading writers. It is perhaps not insignificant that the girl-friend of Crazy Charlie, president of the local Notting Hill Hell's Angels, last year changed her name to Vermilion Sands. Ballard's insights into the nature of urban experience, the deep geography and geology of our great cities, the 'psychic landscapes' which are wholly human in their origin, have created a fiction which, in my view, is profoundly coherent and in harmony with the times. I feel that this can be said of very little generic science fiction, most of which is evidently anti-urban and reactionary in its rejection of the realities which the majority of us in Western Europe and the United States encounter in our daily lives. The city is the future; without the city there is no human progress in the generally accepted sense; we must learn to live in it and with it and to understand our own relationships and functions in its terms; if we could succeed we could emerge with our human sensibilities not only intact, but developed and expanded. I believe that Ballard's fiction helps us to understand ourselves and the roles we lead in an environment which is increasingly under human control and which therefore becomes, increasingly, a human responsibility. The important virtue of Ballard's work, therefore, lies in its ability to define and clarify that responsibility. He once said that science fiction could not be taken seriously until it earned 'the moral authority of a literature won from experience'. I believe that he, in common with a few others who began by exploring the literary possibilities of generic sf forms, can now claim that authority for his fiction. Richard i Cowper Few readers of William Golding's Lord of the Flies or The Inheritors will fail to recognise that they are in the presence of a major literary talent. Golding forces his reader to accept his imaginative perspectives in a way which is wholly remarkable. He achieves this end by means of a series of brilliantly observed and sharply focused pictures. The visual impact of his work is probably the most intense of any novelist writing in English today. Having persuaded us of the physical existence both of his characters and the natural settings in which he has placed them, Golding then proceeds, with an almost diabolic subtlety, to undermine our own pre-conceptions of the nature of mankind. His themes are vast — archetypal; but what sets his novels and stories apart from almost all other works of Science Fiction (and make no mistake they are works of sf) is that the themes and the characters are inseparable. The marooned children Ralph, Piggy, Jack and Simon of Lord of the Flies, the doomed Neanderthalers Lok and Fa of The Inheritors, are as close to being living, breathing, and above all suffering creatures as it is possible to contrive out of words alone. We feel their agony in our bones and recognise it for our own. Golding's novels have been called 'allegories of the human situation' but they are much more than that. The ideas are never allowed to dominate the story. The books are organic wholes. Their creator's own intense involvement with the situations he has imagined drives the allegorical element into the background where it becomes truly symbolic. Golding works in the classic tradition of 'scientific romance'and, in my opinion, is one of the very finest novelists ever to do so. DAVE LANGFORD This unworthy and noticeably low-born inscriber of paltry imaginings considers it convenient to mask the concavity of his admittedly ill-arranged notions with artifices unobtrusively purloined from those more radiant tale-tellers whose refined and pearl-like utterances strike resonant chords within even the granite- walled hearts of the publishers of printed leaves, thereby releasing a not-wholly-to- be-despised inadequacy of silver cash . . . For did the sage A-Non not let fall the gilded remark, "Radiant and eye- gladdening plumage as of the blossoming cherry tree tends notably to lend its parent fowl a like respect"? Thus and thus matters stand; yet whilst lurking incapably in his rat-forsaken hovel, even the presence of his peach- complexioned one of the inner chamber cannot conceal from this one of the detestable superiority of the effete Ernest Bramah and his doglike minion Kai Lung in their dextrous juxtaposition of classical ornateness with a wholly efficacious process of gravity-removal. The ruffians and brigands who without doubt form the greater part of the present assemblage will not fail to extract a certain coarse merriment from the inexorable manner in which the narratives of the repellently fluent Kai Lung tend towards the humiliation of unusually grasping and round- bodied mandarins; the more high-minded will discreetly savour the many perfectly- balanced analogies which adorn the printed leaves and produce an agreeable sensation as of continuously discharged fireworks accompanied by the attentions of well-formed maidens. "Adequately set forth, the history of the Princess Taik and of the virtuous youth occupies all the energies of an agile storyteller for seven weeks," said Kai Lung upon one memorable occasion; a similar difficulty attends this one's recital of Bramah's intimidating superiorities within this much-flattened space. The politely uncomplaining reader will forgive this one's effrontery in merely referring him to The Wallet of Kai Lung and its ever- to-be-praised successors. 73