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37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79
Page 71
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Seacon. 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 71. August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/410.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon. (August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979). 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 71. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/410

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon, 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 71, August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/410.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79
Creator (Local)
  • Seacon
Date August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979
Description Information regarding the guests of honor for Seacon '79.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Shaw, Bob
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Seacon
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Brighton, England
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
  • documents (object genre)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 29
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5301
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 71
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f029_068_073.jpg
Transcript Dreams of Empire We invited some of our favourite writers to write about their favourite sf experience. Our only stipulation was: make it British. We were most definitely not after jingoistic tub-thumping or parochial self-gratulation but pieces which we hoped might reveal the maybe-overlooked core of material at the heart of the living entity that is current sf, and which would certainly tell us as much about our guest contributors as their chosen subjects. You're invited to sample this sampling; we hope you'll find it as intriguing and enlightening a celebration of lost-and-found loves as we do. Mark Adlard Five years ago I noticed, from the annual exchange of cards at Xmas, that one of my old friends was living in a place called West Kirby. This set up such a resonance in my head that I tried to quieten it by consulting a map. It was on the Wirral and looked upon the Dee. Trumpets added their blare to the clamour in my head as I took down my compound Dover edition of Last and First Men and Star Maker, and confirmed that the preface had been written in West Kirby. West Kirby is a tiny place. My friend and his wife are well-read. So I expected to receive a long letter when I wrote to ask for village tales about the great man. After all, he'd been dead for only 25 years. Alas! My friends hadn't heard of him nor, it appeared, had any of their neighbours. I wrote again to say that I was asking about a man who was not merely the greatest sf writer ever, but one of the greatest writers of modern times. They must try harder. Long after I'd given up hope of hearing anything they sent me a large piece from their local paper. It was about a local lady, Agnes Stapledon, widow of a writer, who was about to celebrate her 80th birthday. She was the British president of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom and active in a dozen other things besides. I immediately wrote to ask if I might call upon her. She replied to say that it would be a dreadful thing to drag me between opposite corners of England (I had a job in Kent) but that she was frequently in London on business, which would make it easier for me to call on her there. On the other hand, she said, if I wanted to see her where ... I hastened up to West Kirby like a jolly lover, hungry to look into the eyes of her whom Stapledon left when he went out onto the hill and to whom he returned after his encounter with the Star Maker. It didn't displease me to discover that the Americans had al ready started to beat a path to that door. JOHN BRUNNER Rudyard Kipling? That unprepossessing guy with enormous glasses and a walrus moustache, the spokesman of Empire? Oh yes. Very yes indeed! Among the most vivid sf images of my childhood I'd count the stricken dirigible of With the Night Mail, storm- tossed above the grey Atlantic with her engineer gone crazy, while the captain of the rescuing Royal Mail airship shouted the order to "shunt the lift out of him with a spanner!" He was wrong about dirigibles, but in the companion story As Easy as ABC he got several things very right: the decline of democracy into mob rule, the fact that racial hatred has no place in a civilised society, the need to cut the birthrate if Earth's resources were to be preserved . . . and all that well before the First World War. He has influenced sf writers as disparate as Poul Anderson and Arthur Porges, and at Boskone in 1978 a charming Quaker girl sang me the whole of his Pict's Song from memory. I once did a rough analysis of his published work, and found that approximately one in six or seven of his short stories are sf or fantasy. They range from the early A Conference of the Powers, in which a bridge-builder in India overhears the gods debating whether to destroy his masterpiece spanning the Ganges, through those astonishing tours-de-force without human characters like -007 (railway engines) and The Ship that Found Herself (steel plates and girders and the ship's cat!), by way of speculative sf like In the Same Boat (a man and a woman discover the nightmares haunting them refer to real events which occurred while they were in the womb) and The Finest Story in the World (a young man remembers rowing in a Roman galley, and with Leif Eriksson, and . . .), right up to the complex, subtle stories of his lastyears where he left his readers far behind, like The Children of the Zodiac. He also wrote the classic ghosts-in- reverse story, They, and the deadpan fantasies of Just So Stories, and inPuc/c ofPook'sHill and Rewards and Fairies he brought the people of past ages forward to the present, and he wrote about sea-serpents and lost races and mysterious curses and in possibly my favourite of all his stories, Wireless, he had the soul of Keats strike an echo across a century of time in a poor, lovelorn, tubercular assistant in a chemist's shop while an experimental friend was trying to eavesdrop on the Navy. Kipling, who was possibly the most completely equipped writer ever to tackle the short-story form in the English language, exemplifies the too-often overlooked fact that in our literary tradition there has never been a hard-and-fast line between realistic and fantastic. Indeed, he was a past master at making the fantastic seem credible. KEN BULMER H. G. Wells is the name most frequently and honourably associated with the scientific romance, imaginative literature, sf, and he has exercised the most influence on writers whether they are aware of it or not. Every writer one reads influences one towards or away from what he is saying. I have always believed that sf stands above petty national boundaries. I do not deny the importance of regional literature to the consciousness of nations or national literature to the understanding of neighbours; but these fictions, despite their value, remain fictions of the past. One of the strengths of sf is that it can take an overview of global affairs through the emotions of individuals so that the purely parochial becomes somewhat twee. The international nature of music has much to teach in this area. The term 'mid-Atlantic' is used in a derogatory fashion these days, yet it is useless to deny the profound impact of American sf, so to dismiss the idea of Anglo-American, mid- Atlantic literature is mindless chauvinism. This mingling and mutual enrichment of cultures is 71 BB ■