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37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79
Page 59
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Seacon. 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 59. August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/398.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon. (August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979). 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 59. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/398

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon, 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 59, August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/398.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79
Creator (Local)
  • Seacon
Date August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979
Description Information regarding the guests of honor for Seacon '79.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Shaw, Bob
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Seacon
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Brighton, England
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
  • documents (object genre)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 29
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5301
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 59
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f029_068_061.jpg
Transcript The 1940s didn't see much in the way of sf movies from Britain (or from Hollywood for that matter) but one that almost qualifies as sf is the 1948 Counterblast. Directed by Paul L. Stein (an Austrian) it was about a German scientist who disguises himself as an Australian (the cad) in order to perfect a plague virus in Oxford that will wipe out everyone except Germans. Significantly he is gassed to death in a ship's hold while trying to escape the country. The following year saw The Perfect Woman, a comedy about a female robot that f el I apart at the box office, and in 1950 the Boulting Brothers made the prophetic Seven Days to Noon about a scientist who steals a small (very small) atom bomb and threatens to blow up London unless Britain junks all its atomic weapons. Another typically British approach to a familiar sf theme was The Man In The White Suit which starred Alec Guiness as a scientist who invents something that causes endless trouble - in this case a fabric that never wears out. But afterthat - andbythenthesf movie boom was in full swing - the American influence took over and the British sf movies lost whatever individuality they may have had, though to be fair one must admit that films like the Quatermass series, in spite of following the American monster-from-outer space formula, are essentially British with their underlying Wellsian pessimism and their mood of profound unease... The situation hasn't changed much since then. With the exception of films like The Final Programme, Zardoz (ugh) and The Man Who Fell To Earth, most of the major sf movies that have been made in England in the 1970s have been American, such as Star Wars, Superman, Alien, Saturn 3, The Empire Strikes Back etc. But at least the British contribution in these films, in both the creative and technical sense, is greater than ever and shows that if Britain still had its own film industry it might be making some marvellous movies, even sf ones. • A footnote on the subject of British film technicians: the last 12 months has been a veritable Year of the Jackpot for technicians who have contributed much to sf cinema. Late last year Geoffrey Unsworth, who photographed 2001, Zardoz and Superman among many other films, died. Then, at the beginning of the year, Les Bowie died. Bowie was a special effects expert who was responsible for almost all the effects in British-made sf and fantasy films in the 1950s and 60s (The Quatermass Experiment, Dracula etc) and also trained most of the new generation of effects men working in Britain today. The last film he worked on was Superman. And in June this year John Barry, the production designer on such films as A Clockwork Orange, Star Wars and Superman, died. Earlier in the year he had made his direct ing debut on Saturn 3, which was based on his original story idea, but various problems forced him to leave the production. He was working on The Empire Strikes Back at the time of his death. (John Brosnan istheauthorof FUTURETENSE - THE CINEMA OF SCIENCE FICTION) Copyright 1979 John Brosnan and Peter Nicholls Harry Harrison, one of the most exciting writers of science fiction, and Malcolm Edwards, Administrator of the Science Fiction Foundation, have collaborated on this original survey of spacecraft both as imagined since the beginning of civilization, and as realized in the explosion of achievement. The illustrations range from pictures of early fantasies through to the moon landings and space shuttle and on to far- reaching visions of future interstellar travel. 120 pages 40 colour, 100 black and white i £4.95 0 85613 192 X PUBLISHED 24 SEPTEMBER 1979 it on the ANDROMEDA BOOKS stand and place an early order ©RBIS PUBLISHING