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37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79
Page 58
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Seacon. 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 58. August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 19, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/397.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon. (August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979). 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 58. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/397

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon, 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 58, August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 19, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/397.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79
Creator (Local)
  • Seacon
Date August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979
Description Information regarding the guests of honor for Seacon '79.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Shaw, Bob
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Seacon
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Brighton, England
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
  • documents (object genre)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 29
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5301
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 58
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f029_068_060.jpg
Transcript IKS vBak John Brosnan: The British Science Fiction CINEMA The Big Problem with trying to discuss British science fiction films is that most of the better ones were made by Americans or other foreigners. Admittedly a lot of the worst British sf films were also made by Americans but that's beside the point. The fact is that truly British sf films have always been rare and never more so than now, Things To Come, for instance, which is often paraded as the flagship of the British sf cinema was in reality produced by a Hungarian, Alexander Korda, directed by an American, William Cameron Menzies, and mainly scripted by another Hungarian, Lajos Biro (H. G. Wells did write the original screenplay but it underwent a series of 'modifications'). And though filmed in a British studio it was given visual substance by a large number of Hollywood technicians imported to England for the picture by Korda. Thirty years later it was a similar situation with 2001: A Space Odyssey - again the basic source material was British but the controlling artistic influence was American (actually 2001 has a greater claim to be called British because most of the technicians involved in its making, unlike Things To Come, were members of the British film industry). Other examples? Well, Village of the Damned was directed by the German-born Wolf Rilla and scripted by American Stirling Silliphant, The Damned was directed by American Joe Losey, The Bedsitting Room was directed by American Richard Lester, and Dr Strangelove, 2001 and A Clockwork Orange were, of course, the work of American Stanley Kubrick. Those, in my opinion, are some of the more interesting 'British' sf movies but among the worst are: Day of the Triffids which was written and produced by American Philip Yordan (though some unkind people maintain that he is an Australian) and directed by Hungarian Steve Sekely (with some additional footage by Britisher Freddie Francis), Doppelganger, directed by American Robert Parrish, Zero Population Growth was directed by Michael Campus (nationality unknown) and written, if that's the right word, by Americans Max Ehrlich and Frank DeFelitta and No Blade Of Grass was produced and directed by American Cornel Wilde. The truth is that the British film industry as a whole is, and has been for decades now, a colony of Hollywood and nowhere is this better reflected than in the science fiction cinema. This situation really became established in the 1950s when not only did most of the big American companies set up operation in England to take advantage of cheaper film making costs, easy money etc, but also when many of the British companies, in orderto break into the lucrative American market, began making films as American as possible. The Hammer company was one of the pioneers of this trend, having formed a co-distribution deal with American producer Robert L Lippert, king of the cheap exploitation films (Rocketship XM, Project Moonbase, etc). The device they came up with to ensure that Americans would not suffer culture shock when faced with a movie made in a foreign land and filled with characters talking with quaint accents was to feature some fading American star in the lead role (for some reason British audiences have always been able to watch American films without a reciprocal arrangement). This is why Professor Quatermass, the epitome of the British boffin, is played by Brian Donlevy in Hammer's two 1950s Quatermass films, and why Howard Duff stars in Spaceways, why Dean Jagger is in X-The Unknown, and Forrest Tucker stars in The Abominable Snowman and The Trollenberg Terror. Another small British company, Amalgamated Films, carried this trend as far as it could go by making two movies in England, First Man Into Space and Fiend Without A Face that both pretended to be completely American. Before the 1950s the British cinema still maintained some independence from Hollywood and it's in this period that one finds a few (very few) British sf films. In 1919, for instance, there was the first version of First Men In The Moon (the second version, made in 1964, was produced and directed by Americans though Nigel Kneale did contribute to the script) but there was a gap of ten years before another major sf production came along. This was High Treason in 1929 which was directed by Maurice Elvey and set in the 'future' of 1940 when an imminent world war prompts the formation of an international Peace League. Idealistic in the extreme, its pacifist message is somewhat undermined by the fact that the Peace League leader has to commit murder to prevent the war. Four years later Elvey returned to sf with the English remake of the German film Der Tunnel. German script writer Kurt Siodmak adapted his original screenplay for the English production and the story concerned the building of a tunnel under the Atlantic linking Britain with America in order to "... establish a permanent peace between the English-speaking nations". Presumably Siodmak thought that relations between the two countries weren't too healthy in 1934 and needed some assistance (not that help was quick in coming - the tunnel took 20 years to build). That's prophetic science for you. Alexander Korda's arrival in Britain in 1930 had enormously far-reaching effects on the British film industry, not least in the area of sf and fantasy where his relationship with Wells resulted in Things To Come and The Man Who Could Work Miracles, but ironically one of the best film versions of a Wells novel made in the 1930s came out of an American studio, Universal, yet was the work of a British creative team. This was The Invisible Man, directed by James Whale, scripted by R. C. Sherriff and with a predominantly British cast. 58 -