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37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79
Page 52
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Seacon. 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 52. August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/391.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon. (August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979). 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 52. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/391

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon, 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 52, August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/391.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79
Creator (Local)
  • Seacon
Date August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979
Description Information regarding the guests of honor for Seacon '79.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Shaw, Bob
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Seacon
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Brighton, England
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
  • documents (object genre)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 29
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5301
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 52
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f029_068_054.jpg
Transcript weu-... i f=i*JVL THAT AlsTfO^k VAIHO \>»<LiTC5 SKoOUP HA>JE TVAfrv*- 0Rfc\f*S £7rr*J\cTE»> -THeL^eAC5> vvivtHA 3(jjlOT £GG» TlttB*.,? -THeo*^ £f=>lS\&L£ p\M(ir TO t>0, fttN'T IT. - . So what do we have to show for fourteen years of suburban industry? If the books I listed as the output of 1965 were, for the most part, an uninspiring lot, I think it can be claimed that we have made amends since. I was intending to prove the point by listing a few of the British books that have appeared between the two Worldcons, but research has shown that the task is beyond either my stamina or your patience. It's enough to say that all the following authors have been active and successful in the last decade and a half: vM^ACktve Mark Adlard, Brian Aldiss, Kingsley Amis, Hilary Bailey, Brian N. Ball, J. G. Ballard, Barrington J. Bayley, Chris Boyce, John Brunner, Kenneth Bulmer, Anthony Burgess, Angela Carter, John Christopher, Arthur C. Clarke, D. G. Compton, Michael G. Coney (Coney is British but lives abroad, like Burgess and Clarke), Edmund Cooper, Richard Cowper, Peter Dickinson, David S. Garnett, Stuart Gordon, Terry Green- hough, M. John Harrison, Philip E. High, James P. Hogan (exported to the States), Robert Hold- stock, Colin Kapp, Garry Kilworth, Tanith Lee, Charles Logan, Peter Macey, Donald Malcolm, Douglas R. Mason, David I. Masson, Ian McEwan, J. T Mcintosh, Michael Moorcock, Dan Morgan, Dick Morland, BrendaPearceJohnT. Phillifent, Christopher Priest, Keith Roberts, Josephine Saxton, Bob Shaw, Martin Sherwood, Brian Stableford, Andrew M. Stephenson, Peter Tate, Emma Tennant, J. R. R. Tolkien, E. C. Tubb, Ian Watson, James White, and John Wyndham. The list is probably incomplete, as all lists are, and open to interpretation. Amis, Burgess, Carter, McEwan and Tennant would probably be horrified to see themselves listed as sf writers, yet they all wrote books which we can claim for sf. Equally, many of the names in the same list, whom we know for their sf, have made successful forays into the wider world of general fiction. Perhaps we could agree, though, that we have around fifty writers whose names are not entirely unknown to the sf world. Not a bad score for a small country, especially when you consider that the majority of these authors are in the prime of their careers, and at least half are full-time writers. But how many of them are "major" authors? This is something that is not easy to discuss without seeming sour, but I believe it is fundamental to an understanding of where British writers stand in relation to the rest. We have no Robert Silver- bergs here, no Larry Nivens or Ursula Le Guins. No one, in effect, who can instantly command the centre of the stage by simple force of name. John Brunner, Arthur C. Clarke, Michael Moorcock and Brian Aldiss have won major awards, and J. R. R. Tolkien probably sells more books than the rest of the writers in the world added together . . . but these are exceptions, and exceptional for the writers. Clarke aside, a new novel from any of these people does not automatically attract a flurry of award-nominations. We are rarely stricken by award- fever here, adopting the well- known British phlegm about such matters. It is a hidden strength, albeit a perverse one. Because we do not have the twin spotlights of fame and success on us we are free to grow, free to develop character-roles in the dimmer recesses downstage. Perhaps this is a suburban attitude, one which is the literary equivalent of making garden cultivation or car washing into a symbol of superiority over the sordid urban types. Some truth in that, maybe, but let's not take it too far. The average British sf writer, if there is any such thing, is modest about his work, sure of his own direction, imitates no one and is himself inimitable. British sf keeps its end up, as we say down here in Brighton. 52