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37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79
Page 50
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Seacon. 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 50. August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/389.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon. (August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979). 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 50. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/389

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon, 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 50, August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/389.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79
Creator (Local)
  • Seacon
Date August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979
Description Information regarding the guests of honor for Seacon '79.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Shaw, Bob
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Seacon
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Brighton, England
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
  • documents (object genre)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 29
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5301
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 50
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f029_068_052.jpg
Transcript I I'"" ».»,'.* ■■■'■■.','.'■!. ,.,i i'.'»JP^ E Illltl J -'■''■'A''1 *'-•-• fc. BR ITISH SF, 1965-79 by Christopher Priest Writing science fiction in Britain is rather like living in the suburbs of a great city. If we agree that the city-centre is America, where we find the market-place, the moneychangers and all the fashionable night-spots, then British sf is somewhere out on the fringes. Britain bears the same sort of relationship to the centre of the science fiction city as, say, Brighton bears to London. It is a noticeable distance away, the architecture is quaint and it has certain pretensions to urban convenience ... but to make up for this there is great amenity-value, the inhabitants are friendly (if sometimes eccentric) and they do speak the same language. Although the city-dwellers might cast the occasional envious eye in its direction, for most of the time they can be forgiven for forgetting that it's there. This suburban quality is still present in British sf, but in 1965, when the Worldcon last descended on our shores, it was the one distinguishing feature. We had, for instance, very few publishers of sf. Gollancz, Whiting & Wheaton, Faber and Dobson shared the hardcovers: Corgi, Panther, Four Square, Penguin and Mayflower looked after the paperbacks. Most of the books that came out were American in origin, and most of those were reissues of old stuff. There were very few British sf novels on sale. There was STORMBRINGER by Michael Moorcock (plus a couple of paperback expansions of his magazine stories); THE SQUARES OF THE CITY by John Brunner; EARTHWORKS by Brian Aldiss; A WRINKLE IN THE SKIN by John Christopher; THE QUALTY OF MERCY, D. G. Compton's first novel; A MAN OF DOUBLE DEED by Leonard Daventry; SUNDOG by Brian N. Ball. Ted Carnell's NEW WRITINGS IN SF series had established itself and was appearing quarterly, but few stories showed much vitality. Not, frankly, an exciting bunch. Brunner's best was yet to come, and even the Aldiss was below par (though not nearly so bad as some critics made out at the time). Fourteen years later we find that there are seven or eight hardback publishers who either maintain a science fiction list and label it as such, or who regularly publish sf in with their general fiction. Every major trade paperback firm publishes sf for a competitive market. In any one year you will find rather more than a handful of British books. As the wealth of the American City has grown, so too has its major suburb prospered. But to speak of it only in terms of market expansion is to put a misleading emphasis on commercialism. If it was just a question of increased profitability, Britain would still be a passive importer of foreign produce. What has happened is that there has been a renascence of the spirit here. In 1965, the signs of it were not obvious. There was no clue to it in the world of books, as I have suggested. Nor was it evident in the film and TV worlds, although DOCTOR WHO had just started, 2001 - A SPACE ODYSSEY was in early production, and STAR WARS (most of which was filmed in suburban London) was years away. In fact, the renascence had begun in 1964, and was well under way by the time of the London Worldcon, if known only to a favoured few. These were the readers who bought, and the writers who contributed to, the New Worlds, edited by Michael Moorcock. The story of "the British new wave", as it was known to friend and foe alike, is a bit like the story of sf itself. Just as we Europeans first invented science fiction (Mary Shelley, Jules Verne, H. G. Wells), then exported it across the Atlantic to prosper in its rightful environment, so we led the way in the 1960s with the new sf. New Worlds was a rowdy- house of revolutionary fervour. Boring old writers were booted out ignominiously, boorish young writers rushed in to take their place. British science fiction had once been about middle-class Anglo-Saxons exploring alien planets; now it was about disjointed time, electric guitars, 50