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37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79
Page 39
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Seacon. 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 39. August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/378.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon. (August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979). 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 39. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/378

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon, 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 39, August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/378.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79
Creator (Local)
  • Seacon
Date August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979
Description Information regarding the guests of honor for Seacon '79.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Shaw, Bob
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Seacon
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Brighton, England
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
  • documents (object genre)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 29
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5301
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 39
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f029_068_041.jpg
Transcript HARRYm RRYBELL 2a by Mike Glicksohn ZTtMg^Qate When Napoleon met Wellington, history took notice. When Jerry Rubin encountered Mayor Daley, the whole world was watching. When Rocky finally took on Apollo Creed, a hundred million eyes saw every movement. When Mike Glicksohn met Harry Bell, a goblin and a dalek were too busy to pay any attention. Of such non-events is fannish history made. One of the drawbacks of international fanzine fandom is that the distances and the time-delays involved often make it impossible to pinpoint precisely when two given fans became aware of each other. It's unlikely in the extreme that Harry Bell remembers when he first realized that there was a Canadian fan named Glicksohn who seemed likely to stay around for longer than a generation of BSFA members. In the same frustrating way, I could never pinpoint the precise cartoon or the exact fanzine that first made me aware of a vast talent in England's m somewhat sparsely-populated fanartist field. It may surprise the current generation of English fanzine fans, whose roots are firmly entrenched in such fancy attractive fanzines as MAYA, SEAMONSTERS and SCIENCE FICTION MONTHLY, to learn that as little as a lustrum ago artwork in English fanzines was almost a wasteland. (Those who claim itthenturned intoawaistland haven't seen the new Harry Bell!) Older fans had fond memories of the on-stencil genius of artists such as ATom and Cawthorn but whereas North America had produced a generation of truly inspired fanartists likeTim Kirk, George Barr and Alicia Austin, English fandom seemed to have fallen behind. There were several very valid reasons for this, admittedly, but it still seemed to be true that if a North American fan happened to get an English fanzine, he or she would find that much of the artwork would be a contribution from an American fan. Or else it would look as if it had been drawn directly on stencil by a cat suffering from its first serious hangover. But somewhere around 1974 A Very Definite Change became evident. The English fanzines that I was getting on a reasonably regular basis (as opposed to Pickersgill fanzines which always arrived on an unreasonable basis) as a form of fannish lend-lease for expatriate Englishmen started to contain humorous artwork that was not only good butwasalsoEnglish! And this was obviously not just a local phenomenon because the same distinctive and admirable style started to appear in quite a few of the North American fanzines that were reaching my mailbox at the rate of 1.37 each day. Thus it was that over a period of time the name of Harry Bell began to make a very definite and positive impression on a certain Canadian fanzine fan. You must understand that I bear as much resemblance to an artist as Pickersgill does to a diplomat. The only time I ever drew anything worthwhile in my life was three eights to a pair of aces to beat a J im Odbert straight in a high-stakes game in Minneapolis. But for thirteen years I've been a collector of fantasy and science fiction artwork and in particular of that style of illustration that is known as cartooning. (In fact, Derek Carter credits his staying in Canada instead of returning to England to the fact that once a month at local sf club meetings he knew he could sell me some drawings and eat once again. The fannish worlds of What If could have a field day with that one!) So as I gradually became aware of this new and exciting force in fanart, I became more and more impressed. At any given time there is a definite dearth of really fine fanartists. If there are five top names at a time then faneds can consider themselves lucky. So the appearance of a new and immediately recognizable talent is something to remember. It doesn't happen often: most fanzine artists undergo a fairly extensive period of apprenticeship during which their potential develops and gradually establishes them among the top- ranked, award-worthy artists. It wasn't like that as far as Harry Bell and North American fandom were concerned. Harry seemed to spring, fully developed, from out of a bottle of Newcastle Brown. Suddenly, he was a part of the fannish scene. Fully established, his artistic talent took the world's largest concentration of fanzine fans by storm. He wasn't some neophyte gradually learning his trade; he was already as good as the top North American artists who had dominated fanzines for so long. im ^tjXiP 39