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37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79
Page 36
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Seacon. 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 36. August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/375.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon. (August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979). 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 36. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/375

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon, 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 36, August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/375.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79
Creator (Local)
  • Seacon
Date August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979
Description Information regarding the guests of honor for Seacon '79.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Shaw, Bob
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Seacon
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Brighton, England
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
  • documents (object genre)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 29
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5301
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 36
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f029_068_038.jpg
Transcript .v.v.v.v.v.v.y.v.v.v.v.v.y •.*.*. ■.•.•.;.;•*.;•:•:« Have you ever walked into a bathroom and found a horribly bloated corpse in the tub? I have. It happens to me quite regularly, and the fact that it occurs in dreams is in a way more disturbing than the same event in real life. I mean, any normal citizen could be unfortunate enough to discover a body in a bath - but the fact that I keep dreaming about it means there is something wrong with me. It's a rather distasteful subject, I know, and the only reason I bring it up is that when asked to write something for the Seacon programme booklet I decided to go all public-spirited and produce an article which would acquaint overseas visitors with the idiosyncracies of British hotel bathrooms. Usaful though the information would be, such an aTticle doesn't provide much scope for snappy introductions, and I was forced to cheat by fishing around in the murkier depths of the old subconscious for something which might hook the casual reader. It shows you how unprincipled and unscrupulous authors can be. Actually, bathrooms do seem to exert a baleful influence over many people, especially writers working in the horror genre. (If you pronounce genre with very little emphasis on the last syllable that last sentence contains a neat bilingual pun.) It's possibly because a bathroom is a contrivance, a totally unnatural environment, and when it is fully tiled the association with operating theatres and morgues is hard to escape. For me anyway. In the movies the best, most horrific and most disturbing murders tend to take place in bathrooms, and the reason they work so well is that every member of the audience has known all his life that in the bathroom he is at his most vulnerable. The noise of rushing water is an important factor in this-it advertises the user's exact location to intruders w hile at the same time deafening him to the approach of danger, and just to round the thing off in a workmanlike manner it masks the sounds of struggle, obliterates screams. I'm not, of course, suggesting that any visiting fan is likely to be murdered in the bath or shower at a British convention-even though some attendees do look rather like Anthony Perkins, and I myself have heard high-pitched female voices issuing from rooms I knew were booked out to men. The biggest danger the visitor has to face probably lies in the bathroom fittings themselves. Plumbers in most countries appear to have solved what could be regarded as a fairly elementary engineering problem, namely that of mixing hot and cold water to produce a controlled and stable flow, but here in Britain what emerges from faucet or shower rose is usually highly capricious as regards temperature and volume. The first rule, especially with showers, is to make all the adjustments from outside before you venture in. I can recall cases in which quite solidly built fans, who were incautious enough to step straight into a shower cubicle, turned control knobs by no more than a millimetre and were promptly blasted off their feet by thunderous jets of ice cold or boiling hot water. Lightly built individuals have been pinned to the opposite wall for considerable periods, squirming and bleating piteously, before a sudden drop in water pressure allowed them to slide down and crawl away, their bodies leaden blue or lobster crimson according to which extreme of temperature prevailed at the time. A useful general hint is to examine all faucets before experimenting with them. If you detect a dull cherry-red glow or the presence of icicles - be careful! Bidets, I am glad to say, are as yet very rare in British hotels. I'm in favour of the general principal of the bidet, but in this country the water supply problems I have just mentioned render them dangerous objects indeed. I, for one, am not prepared to risk cleaners coming into the room and finding me bobbing helplessly atop a column of water like a ping-pong ball in a shooting gallery. It might not be so bad if they had the presence of mind to turn the water off gradually, but . . . 36