Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79
Page 27
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Seacon. 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 27. August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/366.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon. (August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979). 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 27. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/366

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon, 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79 - Page 27, August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/482/show/366.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title 37th World Science Fiction Convention, Seacon '79
Creator (Local)
  • Seacon
Date August 23, 1979 - August 27, 1979
Description Information regarding the guests of honor for Seacon '79.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Shaw, Bob
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Seacon
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Brighton, England
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
  • documents (object genre)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 29
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5301
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 27
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f029_068_029.jpg
Transcript V d s d n h )f is le I id as le ke >a *ic he to en ful ike led fou ved leii life. It's self, d in ;the tie'd ance urge d to * he arest Lerge ways rs at iddle id to great interiors, those of cathedrals, industrial assembly buildings wherein small aircraft could fly, and huge country-size extraterrestrial structures such as those imagined in Arthur C. Clarke's Rendezvous with Rama and John Varley's Titan. As with distance, so with duration. At one time ofhis life he was greatly interested in clocks, and if he'd had more money he might have become a collector and ended up with a house full of tickings and chimings. But in the long run he was more drawn to the commoner and more ordinary aspects of timekeeping, the adjustment of watches and alarm clocks, the calls to Time of Day, the counting out of seconds accurately, the estimation of the duration of a moment of awareness (that vital surface which patches together the subjective and objective, the mental and material, the microcosm and the macrocosm), and the slow circling march across the sky of the time-keeping stars. "He never cared for those new digital watches and clocks," Dr. Lewison remarked, "especially the kind that show a black empty face until you press a button. Neither do I for that matter. For a wrist watch or clock he preferred the simplest kind of face: upright black numerals evenly spaced, minute markings around the rim, and all three hands." "I know," Joan Miles agreed. "He said you could see the face of time that way, judge its expression, and sometimes guess what it was up to." Jack Penrose lifted his eyes. "He once told me a desert dream he had," the young man reminisced. "He was standing on this perfectly flat expanse of fine silvery sand. The illumination was general but he knew he was in a desert. He could feel on his back the infrared rays of a very hot sun beating rhythmically down through a thin cloud layer. And as if in time with the beating of those rays he could feel the hard-packed sand vibrating very rapidly - about five or six tight tiny shakes to every one ofhis heartbeats, as if the earth beneath were quaking constantly. There was mist all around him, but it was slowly dissipating upward. Yet as it rose, he could at first see nothing but the endless silver (and invisibly vibrating) plain extending out in all directions. He felt terribly lonely. "Then, as the mist continued to rise by slow stages, there came into view - about two miles away, he judged - a squat dark tower of considerable width - more like a fort, really. Then he noticed two rather thin dark aerial wings jutting out from the tower for miles and miles - an impossible job for cantilevering. He could barely make out the end of one of them in the far distance. And then as he swung his eyes back to the other wing, the longer one, and continued to watch it, he got the impression it was very slowly moving toward him over the silver sand. I "At that point the mist rose another stage. He noticed a shadow rapidly travelling across the plain toward him. He looked up and saw the tower's third snd highest-set wing slicing through the misty air a quarter of a mile overhead like a gigantic revolving dark scythe. He glanced down at his wrist to time the scythe's speed . . . and as he saw the skinny sweep second hand ofhis watch crawling rapidly in infinitesimal five-a-second jerks around the silvery dial, he realized where he was." "Trapped under a wrist watch crystal," Joan heard herself say. "Its ticking the vibration of the sands? Did the mists clear all away? Was it his room outside? Did he peer down?" "He woke up feeling the watch band gripping his wrist oppressively. He'd forgotten to take it off the night before. He said you became more aware of tiny pressures like that as you grew older." Jack's eyes widened a trifle and then frowned as faintly - as though what he had just said had reminded him of another memory, one more difficult to disentangle. "A wristwatch does tick five times a second," Dr. Lewison observed, "though it's harder for me to hear it these days. That compulsion to count . . .the concern with small numbers - you know, somewhere Guy picked up the habit of segregating his coins in different pockets according to their value (some joke about putting a use to all the pockets in a pair of pants) and then he found he'd acquired the additional habit of reaching in and counting them by touch - " "A test of tactile acuity!" Mr. Sarcander put in sharply. "The elderly reassure themselves that way, filling their empty time with little tasks, so they won't have to think unpleasant thoughts about what's coming." "He had another habit involving small numbers and counting," Dr. Lewison pressed on. "He'd read or been told by someone (he told me) about how people have been traced down by the characteristic pattern in which they tear matches out of matchbooks. That inspired him to experiment with different patterns of tearing out matches when he smoked his pipe - every other match in a rank, every third one, from in front, from behind, from the sides in, from the centre out, sometimes (he said) he'd give each match a weight from its position and try to tear them out in such a way that the two sides continued to balance without being symmetrical -" "Anyone tracing him would have thought he was a dozen different people," Jack couldn't help interrupting, relieved to be able to grin at something. "He told me about that too," Joan Miles said rapidly. "Eventually he came to think of the matches mostly as people - or actors on a stage, rather, with the matchbook cover their backdrop. The trick was to tear them out in such a way that you'd always have an effectively balanced stage, though that consideration only became apparent, mostly, when they'd got thinned down in numbers -" Mr. Sarcander's small brusque shrug gave his evaluation of such matchbook charades. Dr. Lewison leaned forward a little. "But the strongest indication by far," he said, "of Guy's obsession with counting and the fascination small numbers held for him, was when he gave up chess for backgammon. In that game you're constantly counting and you're always juggling small numbers in your head, combining and recombining them as you hunt your move. In a way the largest number you work with is six, because there is none higher on a single die. 27