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The Fifth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Program, page 4
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. The Fifth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts - Program, page 4. March 22, 1984 - March 25, 1984. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 26, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/215/show/195.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 22, 1984 - March 25, 1984). The Fifth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts - Program, page 4. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/215/show/195

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, The Fifth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts - Program, page 4, March 22, 1984 - March 25, 1984, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 26, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/215/show/195.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Fifth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 22, 1984 - March 25, 1984
Description A folder containing various items related to the Fifth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Fritz Leiber; Justin Leiber
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction, American
  • Fantasy fiction, American
Subject.Topical (TGM-1)
  • Meetings
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz, 1910-1992
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • documents (object genre)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 12
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Program, page 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f012_036_023.jpg
Transcript THE CONFERENCE GUESTS OF HONOR IN EXACTLY one decade since the publication of his first novel Carrie (1974), Stephen King "has become the most popular writer of horror fiction of all time," with roughly fifty million copies of his books in print world-wide. He has done this partly by taking the creepshow out of the antique dungeons and cellars, in which it had languished by tradition, and putting it into contemporary settings: high schools, supermarkets, hospitals, government labs, even post-holocaust landscapes. But as critic Douglas Winter observes, horror fiction is "an intrinsically subversive art, which seeks the face of reality through the masks of appearance." In the late twentieth century those masks include scientific materialism. King's novels suggest "a dark truth that we all suspect: that rationality and order are facades, illusions of control imposed upon a reality of chaos." His "rational supernaturalism" shatters "the distinction between the supernatural and the empirical, offering the chilling possibility that there is no difference." King began writing stories seriously when he was twelve, as he reports in the autobiographical foreword to Fear Itself. He completed his first novel at 19, while a student at the University of Maine at Orono, but he was to write four more full length manuscripts before Doubleday accepted the fifth, Carrie. Meanwhile he was publishing horror stories in such magazines as Cavalier and Startling Mystery Stories. Unable at first to find a job as a teacher, he worked in a laundry after graduation until a position opened at Hampden Academy in Maine. But the sale of paperback rights to Carrie enabled him to quit teaching in 1974, and the success of that book and its movie version, directed by Brian DePalma, began a meteoric rise to fame and fortune. King produced a book a year for the next decade, and the resultant "ricochet effect" between hardcovers, paperbacks and film versions soon guaranteed a spot on the bestseller list for each new King title. King himself is nonplussed by all this. He enjoys the financial security, but resents the fact that he has become a "brand-name" author "whose paperback contracts are more likely to be reviewed than his books." What he writes, he insists, has little to do with the market. He writes obsessively, and "the stories exist because it occurred to me to write them." But he admits, "I have a salable obsession." Always ahead of his publishers, King has two novels forthcoming: IT and The Talisman, a collaboration with Peter Straub. He has also done an original screenplay, Cat's Eye, for a film to be directed by Lewis Teague. A full list of the titles in the King canon may be found under "Authors' Readings," for 2 p.m. Thursday, when King will read a new story. King will also listen to papers on his work at 9 a.m. Friday in the Sandpiper Room, give a public interview LESLIE FIEDLER is Samuel Clemens Professor of English at the State University of New York at Buffalo. Professor Fiedler served as a Japanese interpreter in the United States Navy during World War II, and ten years alter had begun establishing himself as one of the foremost American critics of literature and society. His Love and Death in the Stephen King with Douglas Winter, whose book on King will be published in mass market by NAL this fall, at 2 p.m. Friday in the Ballroom, and join the autograph party at 5 p.m., again in the Ballroom. Thursday evening at 9 p.m. he will join other authors in the Ballroom to discuss "fiction into film." And of course he will deliver the Guest of Honor's address at 8:30 Saturday night, once more in the Ballroom. A wine and cheese reception will follow in the Foyer outside. American Novel (1960), iconoclastic and to some readers shocking, set the tone for his subsequent criticism. In this work, for instance, his essay "Come Back to the Raft Ag'in, Huck Honey," argues a homoerotic relationship between the "dark" male — Queequeg, Jim -- and the white male -- Leatherstocking, Huck. His interest in the outcast and the character on the social fringe has led him more recently to the book Freaks, Myths and Images of the Secret Self. Professor Fiedler's far-ranging interests have generated out of a fundamental concern for society's communal consciousness and the way it produces archetypal characters and events. Thus his explication of specifically American archetypes reveals their affinity to the universal archetypes, and to the collective unconscious, of Carl G. Jung. Professor Fiedler will deliver an address to the Conference at 8:30 p.m. Friday evening in the Ballroom. A panel on his work will be presented Saturday afternoon at 2 p.m. in the Seagrape Room. Leslie Fiedler