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The Fifth World Fantasy Convention
Page 4
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World Fantasy Convention. The Fifth World Fantasy Convention - Page 4. October 12, 1979 - October 14, 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1453/show/1413.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention. (October 12, 1979 - October 14, 1979). The Fifth World Fantasy Convention - Page 4. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1453/show/1413

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention, The Fifth World Fantasy Convention - Page 4, October 12, 1979 - October 14, 1979, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1453/show/1413.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Fifth World Fantasy Convention
Creator (LCNAF)
  • World Fantasy Convention
Date October 12, 1979 - October 14, 1979
Description Program book for the Fifth World Fantasy Convention.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • World Fantasy Convention
  • King, Stephen
  • Belknap Long, Frank
  • Whelan, Michael
  • Grant, Charles L.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Providence, Rhode Island
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 37
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5309
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f037_113_006.jpg
Transcript ■'*■■•■ v ■•••■; "«■ •--■--■ ■■-. ;;,■-.. .. ':, • ■ It would be anticlimactic to say that the airline also lost my one suitcase. But it happened. I was to leave on Tuesday afternoon. The bag showed up Monday night. Delta claims it's ready when I am — But I can't help thinking about the cameraman on that Cecil B. DeMille epic who, after a massive battle scene during which all the other cameras were either destroyed or malfunctioned, grinned at the director and said: "Ready when you are, C.B." Delta Airlines. Bangor, Maine. It's no wonder Stephen Kings writes what he does. Now the New York Times Book Review may not care for his work, and Kirkus doesn't like ANYTHING that smacks of intelligence, but I'm here to tell you something you already know — we have in our midst a writer not only of immense talent (a talent that somewhat frighteningly continues to develop), but also a man/writer of finely tuned sensitivity. Because it is not the "thing" in the story that makes a horror novel (or shorter piece) effective, it's the people. Cardboard characters faced with slobbering, gibbering, mauling, stinking, clawed-and-fanged, slithering, moaning, bloody, headless, mindless, foul creatures only get soggy. They do not get frightened. They are not terrified. And if they are not frightened, or terrified, then we aren't either. On the other hand, characters who live, breathe, love, hate, fornicate, wheel-and-deal, pray, smile, drink, lust, dedicate, and learn, do get frightened. They do get terrified. And when that happens, so do we. It's an absolutely fool-proof equation: real people equal real emotions. Stephen King knows it well And there's no sense at all asking where, or how, he came by it. He was born and raised in Maine, has spent all but six years ofhis life there, and probably doesn't give a damn that Delta Airlines has to turn on the headlights to find the Bangor airport. Why should he, when he has all he needs right in his pocket: a marvelously witty and extraordinary wife named Tabitha, three children that make me wish I were a rich uncle so I could spoil them rotten, a state that's as beautiful as any I've seen, and ... an avocation that also happens to be his career. Of course, he wasn't always a writer. First there were those fun-filled years at the University of Maine where, in 1968, he met Tabitha. On their second date he took her to the drive-in. He kissed her. She said: "What did you have for dinner?" He said "Spaghetti." She said: "Went a little heavy on the oregano, didn't you?" To get her off his back, he married her in 1971. He has a B.S. Degree from the College of Education, taught high school English before he got smart and got the hell out. His first published story was called "The Glass Floor" and appeared in THE MAGAZINE OF STARTLING STORIES. Fifteen or twenty pieces later he sold Carrie for an advance that's too insulting even to type. He fishes, hikes, plays guitar, has a VCR camera, reads, sees every damned horror movie that comes down the pike, and rides a Yamaha 650. And writes. We all have our favorite King novel (mine happens to be 'Salem'sLot), and we all have our favorite scenes in those books we rank slightly lower (mine, here, is the topiary scene in The Shining). But no matter which it is, it's a solid bet that the effectiveness of the scene lies not suprisingly with a vivid lead-in, an undisturbed continuity and, most importantly, real people. And these people are not necessarily the protagonists. They are secondary and tertiary characters. They are leagues ahead of what might be in another writer's hands mere spear carriers. They are Stuart Ullmann and Dick Hallorann, Larry Crockett and Dud Rogers, Eva Miller and Ann Norton, Nadine Cross and Abagail Freemantle, Donald Elbert and Lloyd Henreid. An extraordinary cross- section not of characterization but of humanity. They do nothing they're not supposed to, and they do everything they should. Real. People. No more (for they would be incomprehensible) and no less (for then they would be unbelieveable). And the horrors and the triumphs that they survive or not are played on a stage that is as grandly constructed as the real world itself. Because it is the real world. It's a place where the reader lives