Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Progress Report #2
Page 10
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
World Fantasy Convention. The Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Progress Report #2 - Page 10. October 30, 1981 - November 1, 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1257/show/1243.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention. (October 30, 1981 - November 1, 1981). The Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Progress Report #2 - Page 10. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1257/show/1243

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention, The Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Progress Report #2 - Page 10, October 30, 1981 - November 1, 1981, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1257/show/1243.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Progress Report #2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • World Fantasy Convention
Date October 30, 1981 - November 1, 1981
Description The second progress report for the Seventh World Fantasy Convention.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • World Fantasy Convention
  • Beagle, Peter S.
  • Froud, Brian
  • Wagner, Karl E.
  • Garner, Alan
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Berkeley, California
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 41
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5313
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f041_153_011.jpg
Transcript On Unicorns In Progress Report #/ we ran 'A Word About Unicorns,' a request to temper the flow of unicorns into the convention. Some of the responses have been very interesting, and we'd like to share them with you. Dear Jack, ... I couldn't agree more with your decision to eschew unicorns as an art form entirely at the World Fantasy Convention. Whatever slight connection my book, The Last Unicorn, may have had with the torrent of unicorn junk that has been rolling over us all in the last several years, I feel as though I ought to apologize to unicorns themselves. They are fierce, proud, mystical beasts, totally unsweetened—there is nothing in the least sentimental or ingratiating about them. If I get sent one more postcard, one more calendar, one more stuffed toy, one more keyring, one more paperweight, one more comic-strip painting of a horned horse, one more Victorian- romantic poem, one more rubber stamp ... if I read one more article on the exploitation of a one-horned goat (poor old Mommy Fortuna couldn't have done half as well), I may yet go and enlist as an apprentice harpy. By way of penance. I certainly don't mean to suggest that unicorns and their representation ought to be the property of any sort of elite—only that they be allowed a brief moratorium, if only for the duration of the Fantasy Convention. Unicorns are creatures of twilight: unlike Dracula, Sherlock Holmes, the Loch Ness Monster and Scott Joplin's music, they cannot survive being made common, even lovingly. Unicorn fans often remind me of the people who swarm out in boats and rubber rafts when the gray whales are migrating. Wanting only to touch the whales, to be among them and share their presence, they do a kind of damage to their vast rhythms and ancient routines that is only now coming to be recognized. It's very hard for us as people to love something that we can best serve by leaving it alone. We may yet love whales and unicorns to death—a fate vampires somehow don't have to worry about. Unicorns are not cuddly. If I ever even hinted that they were, I'm sorry. Let's leave them to their secrets, and let people cover the walls of the Claremont with drawings of Chewbacca or R2D2. They won't mind. My best, Peter S. Beagle «» Dear Art Show Director: ... I would like to comment on the enclosed editorial [from Science Fiction Chronicle, criticizing the committee's unicorn stance]. Here are some more things you should ban from the art show. 1) Women. They have been oppressed enough! Why take the chance on some smart-ass exploiting them under the much-abused banner of "artistic license"? No artwork with women in them should be shown. 2) Men. Aren't you tired of all these hackneyed paintings with men in them? I sure am! If you can't ban all paintings with men in them at least get rid of ones with men that are either too ugly or too handsome. 3) Foliage. Have you ever noticed all the trees and plants in the backgrounds of paintings? BORING. 4) Weapons!! What are we, warmongers or what? 5) Starscapes. If you've seen one you've seen 'em all. 6) The color red. I don't have to tell you what the nickname for Communists is, do I? Nuffsaid! 7) Dragons, pegasus, and other mythical beasts. These must be just as trite as unicorns. If we have to subject the viewers to such mundane dreck, we might as well go home and watch tv. 11