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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 38
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 38. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1210.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 38. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1210

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 38, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1210.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 38
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_039.jpg
Transcript 70 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO SCIENCE FICTION - IV Room 108 CHAIR: Joe Sanders, Lakeland Community College, Ohio. DON W. SEIKER, New Hampshire College, "H. G. Wells Goes to the Movies: The Making and Meaning of Things to Come." In 1936 Things to the Korda-Menzies film production of Come provided millions of viewers with H. G. Wells and the moviegoer misgiving problems denounced and for conceived accuratel forth in ' ideas about history, government, warfare very future of mankind. The modern is likely to have some serious s about most of Wells' solutions to the the film so facilely resolves. Wells was for pandering to the gods of progress creating the most lopsided Utopia ever Yet in many ways the film does not y reflect or agree with his beliefs set the book, The Shape of Things to Come. ROBERT M. PHILMUS, Concordia University - Montreal, "Mechanical Operations of the Spirit and A Tale of a Tub." Arguing that Swift's Tale of a Gulliver's Travels, is science fiction Tub, like in the science is sense of being a fiction based upon uphill work. Yet improbable as it may seem, the theory of madness that is in all respects central to the Tale does bear enough of a parodistic resemblance to mechanical accounts of the spirit propounded by Joseph Glanvill, Thomas Willis, and lesser known hypothesizers on the subject to suggest that this most fantastical aspect of the Tale does have scientific basis. Swift's possible "sources" here underscore what he is doing in the Tale as a whole: turning the modern penchant for mechanistic theorizing against modernity itself. GREGORY RENAULT, Tacoma, Washington, "The Dynamic Mirror: Darko Suvin's Estranged Literary Theory." Darko Suvin's definition of SF as "cognitive estrangement" is one of the most significant attempts to explore the relation between art and politics in SF literature. This paper critically examines Suvin's project, systematically illuminating the hidden assumptions, implicit concepts and contradictory effects of his literary theory. Analysis of fundamental terms such as estrangement and cognition, as well as Suvin's basic delimitation of the genre in his genre criticism and history, points to the flaws inherent in his attempt to construct a formalist basis for political criticism of SF. No Victorian social thinker more linked his political views to the reconstruction of past societies through myth and history than William Morris. At the height of his period of active socialist activity Morris began in his imaginative writings to recreate history along similiar lines. This paper refers to Morris' writings on medieval culture and the history of socialism in order to compare The Roots of the Mountains with News From Nowhere. In the process, it examines how The Roots of the Mountain's fantasy of an early medieval society represents the constraints and the strengths of his Utopian strain of revolutionary communism. GARY AHO, University of Massachusetts, "William Morris, Iceland, and the Late Prose Romances." In the Icelandic Journals, William Morris registers his response to Thing-Vellir with the following words: "once again that thin thread of insight and imagination, which comes so seldom to us, and is such a joy when it comes, did not fail me at the sight of the greatest marvel and most storied place of Iceland." This paper shall discuss what insights might have provided Morris, mentioning how several other critics have interpreted Iceland's significance to Morris. It shall then point out the ways that Iceland's geography and story seem to merge, becoming threads in the tapestries of his late prose romances. FREDERICK KIRCHHOFF, Indiana University-Purdue University, "William Morris' Anti-Books." William Morris' late prose romances were written in response to what he called "the plague of books" characteristics of nineteenth-century industrial society. Their archaic diction and typographical format (in the Kelmscott editions for which they were specifically written) block easy reading. This distrust of the printed word has its internal counterpart in the treatment of written texts within the narratives, where books are either dangerous or at least misleading. Together, these facts suggest an opposition between the story and the written form in which it appears. The romances force the reader to dissociate the story from its text and thus create an illusion of the timeless independence of the story. 72 MONSTERS IN ARTHURIAN LORE Suite 112 CHAIR: Thomas E. Vesce, Mercy College - New York. JOEL FEIMER, Mercy College, Michel: The Significance Arthurian Epic." "The Giant of Mont St. of the Monstrous in 71 WILLIAM MORRIS Room 110 CHAIR: Richard Mathews, University of Tampa. FLORENCE BOOS, University of Iowa, "The Roots of the Mountains as a Pre-Socialist History." In the early twelfth century versions of Arthur's story may be found the episode of Arthur's encounter with the Giant of Mont St. Michel. Geoffrey of Monmouth, Wace, and Layamon all present Arthur's confrontation with the monstrous giant in terms which make the struggle emblematic of Arthur's career as a whole and the significance which the British king has by virtue of his exploits. The Giant represents the demonic; Arthur is the avenging agent of divine providence 39