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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 37
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 37. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1209.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 37. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1209

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 37, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1209.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 37
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_038.jpg
Transcript Sat. 2-3:29 Cont. disorganization, destructive impulse, entropy, promiscuity, castration, economic greed, unharnessed energy, in short, the unredeemed and unsublimated Nature from which Ruskin sought to rescue Victorian man. JUDITH J. KOLLMAN, University of Michigan-Flint, "Dionysus the Areopagite and Charles Williams' The Place of the Lion: The Place of the Beasts." The Place of the Lion is about confrontations or eidola combination of beings of the into suburban between human being and angels, Neoplatonic creatures that are a Plato's Ideals with the supernatural Old and New Testaments. Summoned England, they are, as pure energy or idea, invisible and immaterial. In obedience to the laws of the material world, they assume forms, usually that of symbolically appropriate animals. The characters meet these God-like powers in a series of theophanies, through which Williams demonstrates that the place of the lion is, along with the other angelical energies, within the human psyche. Session XIV, Saturday, 4-5:30 p.m. AUTHORS' READINGS Sandpiper Room 4 p.m. JOSEPH L. GREEN, reading Inheritance of Crystal. "A Crystal Love," from Joe Green began his science fict in England with contributions his first novel, The Loafers ion writing career to New Worlds, and of Refuge, was published there. Better known The Mind Behind the Eye, Conscie in this country are nee Interplanetary, Star Probe and The Horde. Joe is also well-known and calls himself a latest- work is a story he will read affair, and comes for his lucid science articles, "hardscience" writer. His trilogy called Crystal. The concerns an alien/human love from the second volume. 5 p.m. TIMOTHY ROBERT SULLIVAN, reading forthcoming in Asimov's. "The Comedian," Tim Sullivan is an FAU graduate, and suggestion led to the establishment o Burnett Swann Fund. Tim has taught SF served for three years as chairman of Readings Program for ICFA. He is writers who first published in Une since placed stories in New Dimensions The Twilight Zone, and Asimov's. A his appeared in the February Fantasy the man whose f the Thomas there, and the Authors' among the new arth, and has , Chrysalis, faery tale of Newsletter." He is presently at work on a fantasy entitled The Madonna Matrix. 6 p.m. BRAD LINAWEAVER, reading "Clutter," forthcoming in Amazing Stories. Brad Linaweaver teaches creative writing to prisoners under the aegis of Mercer College, Atlanta. He is a graduate of Florida State and Rollins College. He has written numerous stories and articles for the Underground press, has four stories sold to Amazing. 69 FANTASY & RELIGION Seagrape Room CHAIR: Gloria Kline, Florida Atlantic University. GORDON W. SAUNDERS, Trinity College, "Beyond the Grave in the Mountains: Fantastic Allegory as Theological Paideia." The last five years have seen a significant increase in the publication of fantastic allegory by religious publishing houses. This paper analyzes three sets of allegories: Calvin Miller's, "Singer" trilogy (Intervarsity Press), John White's "Anthropos" books (Intervarsity Press), Places several thesis: because and Hannah Hurnard's Hinds' Feet on High and sequel (Tyndale House), along with theories of allegory, to develop its major allegory is experiencing a resurgence it makes possible an explication of for which no adequate, self-conscious, experience conceptual terminology yet exists, and because it provides, vicariously, experiences which teach more clearly than discursive exposition while providing, simultaneously, the exposition which elucidates those experiences. MICHAEL R. COLLINGS, Pepperdine University. "Strangers in Estranged Lands: Mormonism in Science Fiction." Religion and science fiction rarely blend easily. For religion to appear in science fiction — and to work with it rather than against it — it becomes necessary to reduce religion to stereotypes and cliches. The examples investigated deal directly with kinds of allusions to Mormonism in writers as disparate as Heinlein, Ian Watson, Dean Ing, Philip Jose Farmer, and Piers Anthony. In each, regardless of the depth or superficiality of treatment, the pattern emerges: religion ceases to function as doctrine, and instead becomes cliche or stereotype, a short cut metaphor for ideas and attitudes antithetical to those espoused by science fiction. PETER M. L0WENTR0UT, California Long Beach. "Science Fiction & on the Future of Religion." State University, Fantasy: Window The steady demythologization of culture in recent centuries has drained traditional meaning from the world and fragmented values and moral concepts. But at the cutting edge of our culture there is now emerging an axiomatic "shifting of gears" which may have much to do with meeting the spiritual crisis. Science fiction and fantasy as well as recent religious inquiry participate deeply in this shift. 38