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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 36
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 36. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1208.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 36. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1208

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 36, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1208.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 36
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_037.jpg
Transcript generations. One well-known tale, "How the Rabbi Was Changed into a Werewolf," is especially interesting for its connections to medieval Latin and English sources. Its peculiar brand and misogynistic ethics will be described. HARRIS LENOWITZ, University of Utah, "A Fairy Tale of Jacob Frank." Historically, "Frank-ism" derives from Lurianic and Sabbatean figures, and ideologically from Gnosticism and Sabbatean mythology. This paper traces the Frankist movement, its hagiographic and allegoric backgrounds, and presents an analysis of the allegorical structure of the tale. 66 GAMES IN LITERATURE Suite 112 CHAIR: Laurence Donovan, University of Miami. BUD FOOTE, Georgia Institute of Technology, "The Board and the Book." The board game (or spacial map) has been utilized in fiction from Alice in Wonderland through John Brunner's Squares of the City and Faulkner and Joyce. This paper considers the fading of this practice as fixed territoriality, is replaced in our day by interior psychology. CAMILLE LA BOSSIERE, University of Ottawa, "A Capricious Algorithm: Alain Robbe-Grillet's Game in L'Annee derniere a Marienbad." In this examination of the use of the mathematical game of Nim in L'Annee derniere a Marienbad, it becomes clear that in affirming the independence and efficacy of the "I" to escape a repetition of analogous actions, Robbe-Grillet dramatizes his own static, neutral role as narrator. TOM SMITH, Castleton, Vermont, "Some Traffic: Anagrammatic Poems." A reading of anagrammatic poems of great wit and complexity. 67 FILM FANTASY AS IDEOLOGICAL REPRESENTATION Suite 116 CHAIR: Mike Budd, Florida Atlantic University. DOUGLAS GOMERY, University of Maryland, "The Movie Made-for-Television: Sports Fantasy and Ideological Production." Fantasy may be examined as an instrument reinforcing or subverting existing social attitudes. Films, especially those made for television about sports figures seem to be based on a concrete, real world, but in fact portray a consistently fantastic image — no racial tensions, no economic conflicts. The best players win. Athletes in these films die from cancer, not their football injuries. I shall analyze what was the first "hit" TV movie, Brian's Song, a "love story" between two football players. Slides from the film illustrate the talk. NANCY KETCHIFF, North Carolina State University, "Modernism and the Representation of Fantasy: Cubism and Expressionism in The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari." By around 1915-1920, the various commercial film industries, led by Hollywood, had developed a mode of film discourse, realist narrative, which was capable of articulating fairly complex differences between the registers of fantasy and an omniscient, naturalized reality. At about the same time, though, two important modernist movements, Cubism in France and Expressionism in Germany, were in different ways and to different degrees challenging the very realist, illusionistic tradition in painting from which the new filmic discourse partly derived. One of the first films to bring together these conflicting modes of realism and modernism was The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, made in Germany in 1919. In it we can see aspects of both Expressionism and the more radical Cubism as they inflect the film's representations of fantasy, insanity, and reality. ALLAN HIRSH, Central Connecticut State College, "Uncanny Affect in the Horror Film." Does the uncanny in horror films stretch to one's thinking things into being? Is introjection projected in the dark? In the acceptable horror film, the inanimate thought becomes animated. Within the film, the anxiety-arousing fantasy is managed and ceases to be a mystery. Finally, form allays anxiety. 68 ANIMALS IN MYTH AND LEGEND Room 118 CHAIR: Christa-Maria Beardsley, Indiana University at South Bend. MARGARET M. Not Dead: Trilogy." DUNN, Stetson University, "The Dragon is He Is Alive and Well in the Earthsea Have the dragons of antiquity become nothing more than symbols, fantastic creatures which have no place in serious literature? Ursula LeGuin's answer in the Earthsea Trilogy is a resounding "No!" as she restores the legendary fire-drake to his rightful place as the embodiment of the incomprehensible forces of darkness. Modern man must realize, says LeGuin, that these forces must forever lie beyond the purview of his comprehension, and that if he is to cope with such inevitable aspects of human life as evil and pain and death, then it is to myth and imagination — it is, in essense, to the dragon — that he must once again return. ROBERT CASILLO, University of Miami, "Ruskin and 'The Place of the Dragons'." Ruskin's "The Place of Dragons" not only contains a sustained reading of Carpaccio's St. George and the Dragon but in effect appropriates that painting as a vivid ideogram of Ruskin's life and works, a visual summary of Ruskin's main goals and conflicts. The Dragon assimilates to Ruskin's negative principle or "The Lord of Waste"; it is an overdetermined symbol of impurity, 37