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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 35
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 35. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1207.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 35. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1207

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 35, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1207.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 35
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_036.jpg
Transcript Sat. 2-3:29 Cont. emphasizes his point through a language based on Germanic-Nordic roots, rich in metaphor, rejecting the Latinate and Frenchified vocabulary of technology. LILLIAN HELDRETH, University of Northern Michigan, "Shadow of the Swashbuckler: Social Conscience Invades Darkover." Marion Zimmer Bradley's Darkover novels originated in escapist sword-and-sorcery fantasy, with all the trappings of adolescent adventure in exotic worlds where men can be men, wallowing in combat and sex. Yet even these early efforts show elements of conscience, which become more dominant until the later Darkover novels become vehicles for a sophisticated, radical appraisal of human society and sex roles. This paper examines the development of Bradley's social conscience, demonstrating that the former confessions' author presents in her popular series a reversed view of sword-and-sorcery that shows what it would be like truly to live in the world of our fantasies — especially for women. INGEBORG KOHN, University of Arizona, "Reversal of Tradition, Oblivion of Memory: The Fantastic Vision of Monique Wittig's Utopia in Les Guerilleres. J? The creation of a fantastic world as a form of social criticism: this is the achevement of the French contemporary novelist/feminist Monique Wittig in Les Guerilleres (The women warriors). Her aim is to totally reverse the social order in Western society by means of substituting a femal discours. This would abolish all our myths and traditions, responsible for the creation and perpetuation of phallologocentrism in a biblico-capitalist society. The setting of this imaginary new world is a fantasy land, a paradise of astonishing species of fauna and flora. Its inhabitants, the guerilleres, invent a mythical past which places women in the center of the universe. 64 THE FANTASTIC AND THE 19TH CENTURY CITYSCAPE Room 108 CHAIR: Louise Fiber Luce, Miami University. GRANT CRICHFIELD, University of Vermont, "Locus Hocus Pocus in Theophile Gautier's 'Arria Marcella'." Gautier's dynamic cityscape sets up the tensions which create the fantastic effect of this text. Such typically fantastic motifs as the lava bust sprung to life; pagan sensuality vs. Christian morality; the conquest of time and mortality; the momentarily actualized ideal; the acceptance of a new, if possible, logic all depend on the labyrinthine temenos that is Pompeii. The reintegrated and reanimated ruins constitute the major rupture with ordinary physical, temporal and psychic realities which leads to a fearful malaise; the city itself is the primary provocation for the explicit hesitation essential to the fantastic experience. HEIDI E. FALETTI, Pennsylvania State University, The Behrend College, "The Mythic Modernism of Demonic St. Petersburg in Gogol's Nevsky Avenue." St. Petersburg appears in Russian literature, from the Age of Pushkin to Symbolism, as the mythic personification of the sterile Western metropolis of modern epoch. This paper will explore Gogol's tale, Nevsky Avenue, with focus on the supernatural suggestion of a fateful impact the city has on the lives of two young men. Concentration will be on imagery, mood, and plot elements which place in relief both the city's diabolical atmosphere and the juxtaposition of dream and reality which defines the plight of the characters. WALTER M. GERSHUNNY, Northeastern University, "The Mystical Cities of Flanders in the Poetry of Georges Rodenbach." The poetry of Belgian symbolist Georges Rodenbach evokes the silent mysteries of the cities of his native Flanders. Enshrouded in Northern mists, his cities appear as extensions of the poet's own vitiated soul. Somnolent and abandoned, they are caught in the throes of death and decay. Spirituality proves the only source of their salvation; suffused in an aura of mystical devotion, these dormant cities present an otherworldly vision on the Flemish landscape. 65 THE FANTASTIC IN JEWISH LITERATURE I: THE MIDDLE AGES THROUGH THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY Room 110 CHAIR: David Miller, Ohio State University. BRUCE ROSS, State University of New York, "Pathetic Creation: The Medieval and Renaissance Debate over the Golem Figure." Isaac Bashevi's Singer maintains that the golem figure in H. Leivick's play The Golem fails to achieve its intentions because it "lacks a moral imperative." Singer's observation restates the earlier Hasidic and Kabbalist assessments and highlights the pathos of a being that interacts with human beings while lacking a will of its own. The paper will examine the theological and literary traditions of the golem figure and judge the limitations and ambiguities of viewing this being as a metaphor of the relationship between God and man. MARK BERNHEIM, Miami University, "'How the Rabbi Was Changed into a Werewolf and the Mayse-Bukh of 1602." Appearing around the year 1600, the Mayse-bukh has played an important if overlooked role in the continuation of Yiddish literature. This collection of stories fuses popular, folk, and religious traditions into a basically harmonious opus that is important for revealing attitudes and beliefs of the emerging Yiddish-speaking world centered in the Rhineland. Moral and theological values are affixed to familiar stories of conduct, in the hopes that the largely female readership will nourish the traditions at home for future 36