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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 34
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 34. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1206.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 34. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1206

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 34, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1206.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 34
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_035.jpg
Transcript In these two North American novels of the 1970's, both concerning travel through time and space, the search for the absolute is reflected in the ties and fatal relationships established between the vampire and his or her victims. The character of this creature leads itself to universal interpretations on the human condition and to more particular interpretations on modern occidental man. as a supernatural the Devil, while blend of human animal imagery. 62 FANTASTIC PERSPECTIVE: THREE CLASSIC TEXTS Room 118 CHAIR: Norman Nathan, Florida Atlantic University. DEBBIE JAY, Texas Tech University, "Of Men and of Demons: The Duchess of Malfi." Except for the Cardinal, John Webster taints the characters in the Duchess of Malfi (before 1614) with varying degrees of evil, using supernatural association to lend credibility to the characters' evil. Though never portrayed being, the Cardinal represents Ferdinand and Bosola share a witchcraft and supernatural Through this blend, both characters feasibly suffer guilt. In opposition to the Cardinal's total evil, the Duchess is surrounded by suggested evil: her spirit remains vital in life and death. Melding images in varying degrees allows fuller character development and illustrates Webster's belief that man could be more evil than demons. ISSA PETERS, American Graduate School of International Management, "Social Criticism and Fantasy in The Arabian Nights: 'The Envious Sisters'." That the fantastic element in The One Thousand and One Nights is employed to entertain the audience with imaginary ventures or as a means of wish fulfillment of an otherwise miserable world, "The Envious Sisters" proves to be an idle and narrow view. The story is disguised social criticism of arbitrary punishment for crime, thus relating directly to the frame story of the Nights. The devices of the fantastic utilized in the story, such as the three magical objects, serve to advance the plot as well as to disguise social criticism which would otherwise be too direct and therefore dangerous to the narrator. MARILYN JURICH, Suffolk University, "The Fugue of 'Alienation' and Fantasy in Blake's Songs of Innocence and Experience." In Songs of Innocence and Experience, Blake sets up a dialectic, vioce detached from mind, conscious from unconscious; participant's sensibility contrasted with observer's discernment. The means by which Blake seeks to raise critical consciousness in his reader clearly resembles the "alienation" effect Brecht accomplishes in the epic theater. The spectator's intelligence must remain active even while he sympathizes with the plight of the victim. Session XIII, Saturday, 2-3:29 p.m. AUTHORS' READINGS Sandpiper Room 2 p.m. FREDERIK POHL, reading two new "Options" and "The New Neighbors." short stories, Fred Pohl's credits and accomplishments are legendary in science fiction. Beginning as a first generation fan (the Futurians), and an editor at 19, he has helped to shape the genre as much or more than any other writer. Still going strong after 40 years, his novels regularly place high on the bestseller lists, and on the ballots for Hugo and Nebula Awards. Pohl's early collaboration with C. M. Kornbluth, The Space Merchants, is a classic often chosen for college classes, while Man Plus, Gateway, Beyond the Blue Event Horizon, and The Cool War have either won, or placed second, in major awards balloting. Pohl's editorship of I£ won that magazine three Hugo Awards, while under his leadership Galaxy introduced the finest new writers of the day. Pohl has also headed the SFWA and World SF, served actively in SFRA, the American Astronautical Society, British Interplanetary Society, New York Academy of Sciences, the World Future Society and countless other causes. 3 p.m. KARL HANSEN, reading an excerpt from progress, from The Hybrids Trilogy. a novel in Karl Hansen is a medical officer for the Public Health Service on the- Ute Mountain Indian Reservation, but plans to retire from medicine at the end of his tour to write full time. His first novel, Wargames drew enthusiastic reviews last year. Hansen has published stories in Analog, Galileo, and the Chyrsalis anthologies, as well as the Berkeley Showcase series. He writes what is known as "hard science" fiction. 63 IMAGINARY SOCIETIES AS SOCIAL CRITICISM II Seagrape Room CHAIR: 0. M. Drekonja, St. John's University, Collegeville, Michigan. RICHARD MATHEWS, University of Tampa, "Social Roots in William Morris's The Roots of the Mountain." After years of lecturing and organizing for political and social change, William Morris turned to fiction to portray alternative social visions. The House of the Wolfings (1888) and The Roots of the Mountains (1889) not only are the first modern fantasy novels written in English, but are thematic partners which reveal a fresh and strong communal society rooted in the British past. The Roots of the Mountains establishes historical roots for social organizations based on kinship with one's fellow man and with the earth. Morris 35