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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 33
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 33. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1205.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 33. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1205

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 33, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1205.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 33
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_034.jpg
Transcript Sat. 11-12:30 Cont. CHAIR: C. W. Sullivan III, East Carolina University. demonstrates Wilson Bryan Key's premise in Subliminal Seduction that advertising's persuasive and highly powers are derived from suggestive scenes. hidden embeds ANTHONY AMBR0GI0, Wayne State University, "Horror Films' First Sex Symbol: Woman as All Things to All Monsters." Before King Kong (1933), Fay Wray was already horror films' first Sex Symbol; her presense virtually guaranteed a horror movie's aberrant sexuality (e.g., she was lusted after as a hunting prize in The Most Dangerous Game — 1932 — and perversely worshipped in Mystery of the Wax Museam — 1933). William Troy notwithstanding, no wonder Kong is so rife with sexual tension — especially since miscegenation and rape were popularly associated with apes anyway. But Kong ultimately stands these concepts on their ear: its ape becomes a noble savage; like the film's two men, adolescent Kong gains maturity through the love of a good woman. 59 BRIAN ALDISS Room 108 CHAIR: Richard Mathews, University of Tampa. CHARLES PLATT, SF author, New York City, Appreciation of Brian Aldiss." "An A conversational discussion of Brian Aldiss' work in relation to the process of SF publishing. Charles Piatt was a staff member of the influencial SF magazine New Worlds and as such was a participant in the innovative new movement in SF which originated in England and was associated with that magazine. PATRICK G. MCLEOD, Jacksonville "Frankenstein Reconsidered." University, A discussion of Brian Aldiss' novel Frankenstein Unbound as it reflects the author's stylistic and thematic interest, and as it expresses an enduring motif in SF. RICHARD MATHEWS, University of Tampa, "Failed Horse or Failed Rider? The Question of Human Failure in the Fiction of Brian Aldiss." In a startling range of short stories and novels, Brian Aldiss returns to the problem of failure — failure of men and machines, and even of whole species and civilizations. His books examine the origins of a failure of enormous proportions as he searches for reasons and causes in the primitive past as well as in the far-distant future. By examining two early treatments of the problem in the short story, "The Failed Man" and the novel Non-Stop, this paper identifies the scope of the problem in Aldiss' fiction and suggests how the author begins to answer the questions he raises. 60 ARTHUR AND MERLIN IN CONTEMPORARY DRESS Room 110 RAYMOND H. THOMPSON, Acadia University, "The Immortal Enchanter: Merlin in Modern Fantasy." Alan Garner in the Alderley Books, C.S. Lewis in That Hideous Strength, and Susan Cooper in The Dark Is Rising series all enlist a revived Merlin as a powerful champion fighting for the cause of good against evil. However, they deliberately burden him with responsibility so that the young protagonists have freedom to learn and develop maturity. In each case good triumphs. Yet just as the stuggle between good and evil can never be concluded while humanity endures, so Merlin, the exponent of good, cannot die. Instead he withdraws from mortal sight once again. VEATRICE C. NELSON, Morehouse College, Atlanta, "Between Two Merlins: The Quest of a Modern Arthur in John Le Carre's Smiley Trilogy." In John Le Carre's three espionage thrillers about George Smiley, the gentlemanly British secret agent par excellence, Arthurian matter supplies many obvious images. The dual nature of Merlins appears in the antithetical characters Control and Karla, respectively heads of the British and Russian intelligence agencies; and Arthur takes on the form of George Smiley, the middle-aged intelligence expert and hero of the trilogy. The legendary figures are more than simply informing spirits for the major characters, though. The difference between the polarities of Merlin's nature provides the tension for the trilogy's main action and Arthur's dilemma with love and loyalty provides the motivation for Smiley's movements. 61 THE VAMPIRE: CONTEMPORARY VARIATIONS SESSION II Suite 116 CHAIR: Leonard G. Heldreth, Northern Michigan University. RAYMOND T. MCNALLY, Boston College, "Some Recent Cases of Vampirism in History and in Films since 1940." After the 1940's the vampire fell on hard times in the movies; during the late Fifties American International Pictures linked the theme with teenagers. Horror of Dracula (1958) represented the harbinger of a new, creative effort to revive the vampire theme, resulting in Daughters of Darkness (1970), Immoral Tales (1974), In Search of Dracula (1972), the TV Dracula with Jack Palance (1973), Martin (1977), and a TV Count Dracula with Louis Jordan (1978), which all contributed to the development of the genre. What I call "The Vampire Flood of 1979" took place with the release of Werner Herzog's Nosferatu, Love At First Bite, Salem's Lot, and Dracula with Frank Langella. Reference will also be made to recent cases of vampirism, such as a documented case of autovampirism in 1964 and the court trial of a self-proclaimed "living vampire" in 1981. VIRGINIA A. HARGER-GRINLING, Memorial University of Newfoundland, "Interview with the Vampire and Heloise: Two Contemporary Variations on the Theme of the Vampire." 34