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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 31
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 31. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1203.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 31. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1203

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 31, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1203.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 31
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_032.jpg
Transcript Sat. 9-10:30 Cont. LORRAINE MCMULLEN, University of Ottawa, "Humour and Fantasy in Jack Hodgins' Resurrection of Joseph Bourne." Jack Hodgins is a west coast writer whose novels and stories weave humour with fantasy to present an essentially moralistic approach to life. Hodgins exploits the local colour of his west coast background and populates his lush setting with bizarre, sometimes ludicrous characters, whom he involves in fantastic, often humorous situations. In Resurrection of Joseph Bourne, the resurrection of Bourne, the cranky old radio host in the small town of Port Annie, through the intervention of a mysterious stranger, initiates a chain of fantastic events, all designed to point out the faxlseness of materialistic values and the power of love to transform the world. Hodgins exuberant language and comic inventiveness entertain us as he leads us with his Port Annie characters into a world stripped of material values, united by love. OLENA H. SACIUK, Inter-American University of Puerto Rice, San German, "Today Reflected in Tomorrow: Science Fiction Jokes as Satire." Along with ^the popularity of science fiction literature, 'science fiction humor, especially in the form of a joke, has grown in popularity and is used even in prestigious professional journals to make a point or satirize not the future but the present and the universal and ever-existing foibles of human nature. This combination of the present in the future gives the science fiction joke an extraterrestrial twist. Furthermore, familiar situations and expressions in a sci-fi context acquire a new irony or satirical ramifications as they mock us or our distorted values. ALICE S. NAKHIMOVSKY, Colgate University, "The Black Humor of Daniil Kharms." "An old woman, from an excess of curiosity, fell out of a window, smashed, and broke into pieces. Then a different old woman stuck her head out of the window and started looking at the broken one, but from an excess of curiosity she also fell out the window, smashed, and broke into pieces." Having begun in so odd a fashion, this tiny story will close in a few paragraphs in an even more unsettling way. Kharms' prose miniatures are a delicate balance of his ordinary, autobiographical early 20th century life in Russia and the fantasy-grotesque. I propose to show how they work, concentrating on stylistic quirks and philosophical play. HEIDI E. FALETTI, Pennsylvania State University, "The Metaphysical Satire of Gogol's Narrative Fantasies." Gogol's fantasy satire on the diabolical absurdity of bureaucratic St. Petersburg is exemplified in The Nose and The Overcoat. In these stories, the inhabitants of the city become unreal by reduction to rank, status, and accuracy. Gogol's satire operates by use of surrealistic contrasts, patterns of irrelevance, and non-communicative dialogue. In The Nose, satirical fantasy focuses on the wandering, disembodied nose of a petty official, a sign of the confusion inherent in bureaucracy. In The Overcoat, the demise of a meek document copier through the loss of his luscious new overcoat reflects the metaphysical precariousness of his routine existence. 56 VIOLENCE AND THE FANTASTIC IN MOVIES Suite 116 CHAIR: Phil Kuhn, University of Florida. RICHARD E. HERSH, University of Florida, "Collage and Creation — Necessary Violence and Thief." Michael Mann's Thief narrates for Mann's major character, Frank, and for Mann himself the triumph of imagination in violent conflict with the intellect. Initially, the movie is a collage of epic devices and traditionally, even classically, literary parts rationally assembled. Frank's approach to his life — a life he attempts to construct piece by ill-fitting piece according to a collage he assembled and refers to — mirrors the filmic narrative collage. Yet collage is a mechanical, orderly compilation of sharp but still images — nature morte; and in a necessarily violent revolt against rational assemblage, Frank abandons collage and embraces creative life at the edge of experience just as Mann abandons the traditional and literary forms for the imaginative narrative method of moving picture. RICHARD SUGG, Florida International University, "The Meaning of Alex's Violent Fantasies in A Clockwork Orange." Although the film is now ten years old, A Clockwork Orange is still remembered and cited as a benchmark in the history of violence in films. Not only is there plenty of violence in the film, but also the subject of the film is violence in human nature; and an important subtext is the relationship of violence to the creative energy that begets art. At the center of all these concerns are the fantasies of the main character, Alex — visions of being a vampire, of exploding atomic fireballs over cities, of whipping Christ on the road to Calvary. To understand the meaning of these fantasies, not just to Alex but also in relation to the film itself, is to understand the meaning of A Clockwork Orange. Session XII, Saturday, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. AUTHORS' READINGS Sandpiper Room 11 a.m. JOHN MORRESSY, reading "Welcome To WIZCON," a new story about a Wizard's convention. John Morressy is Writer in Residence at Franklin Pierce College in New Hampshire. The third volume 32