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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 30
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 30. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1202.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 30. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1202

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 30, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1202.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 30
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_031.jpg
Transcript alternative to the prevailing patriarchal culture — a society, in fact, that does not include men. It presents an alternative to a society where degradation and violent treatment of women is a normal, albeit unfortunate occurrence. The society of the Motherline tribes is far more humane, far less brutal and exploitive, than our prevailing American culture's treatment and depiction of women. And the novel is not a solitary phenomenon; it shares the concerns of other works that are a part of the recent wave of feminist science fiction. 54 53 THE MYSTICAL CONSCIOUSNESS IN FANTASY Room 108 CHAIR: Karen Davis. Schaafsma, University of California, MARGARET S. MAURIN, Bryn Mawr College, "Marcel Brion and the Quest for Harmony." Thoughout the centuries, the fantastic has often been linked to what might be called a mystical consciousness of the universe. Why this should be so is readily apparent, for the fantastic presupposes the existence of a dimension of reality other than that of everyday human experience, and induces a heightened awareness of the self, the discrete world, the realm of the spiritual and of the obscure relationships that govern them. The present study is devoted to a selected number of Brion's stories that constitute a simple revelation of the mysterious workings of the universe, and a form of initiation in which the protagonist undergoes a series of tests or trials designed to render him worthy of the ultimate revelation. J. BROOKS BOUSON, Mundelein College, "The Mystical Consciousness of Edwin Muir." Ranked among the great visionary poets of the English tradition, the Scottish poet Edwin Muir (1887-1959) was obsessed with what he called the world of the "fable," a strange and "hidden" world revealed to him in dreams and visions. This paper discusses Muir's autobiographical and poetic account of his contact with the world of the fable and shows how his verse was born of his deep-seated urge to communicate his visionary experiences of the radical innocence of life and thus to convey something of the boundless mystery which he perceived at the core of human experience. KAREN SCHAAFSMA, University of California, Sentient Cosmos in Fantasy." "The The vision of the cosmos as a whole, as "an organism at once real, living, and sacred" is common to most works of fantasy fiction, from MacDonald to Le Guin, and a major theme of many. This paper will examine the ways in which this animistic vision manifests itself in fantasy (talking animals and trees, natural objects and places which possess magical or sacred powers) and will also discuss its thematic implicatons. AN INTRODUCTION TO SCIENCE FICTION IN SPAIN Room 110 CHAIR: Janet Diaz, Texas Tech University. BONNIE MCSORLEY, Northeastern University, "Buero Vallejo's Mito and El tragalus: The Twilight Zone of Hope." In El tragaluz and Mito, science fiction elements are introduced to dramatize the realization of hope. In the first, Buero uses a technique akin to time travel to show a distant future where problems of existential identity and alienation have been diminished, if not resolved. In the second, Buero turns toward the mysteries of outer space. The unknown is envisioned not as a finite entity that decreases with science's advancements, but infinite and rapidly expanding as the interface between knowledge and ignorance increases. To recognize the impossibility of our quest, yet to reach out, is a message which Buero's theater attempts to inspire. GENARO J. PEREZ, University of Texas, "Major Cultivators, Themes and Motifs of Science Fiction in Spain: A Bird's Eye View." Very little has been written concerning Spanish science fiction, although the amount of published titles is large by any standards. The cause may be that many scholars and critics regard S-F as para-literature — popular, low, plebeian literary production — which does not merit scholarly research. The present paper attempts to give a panoramic view of S-F published in Spain, without a thorough evaluation of its literary merits; and it will examine works of some prominent cultivators of the genre and focus on those themes and motifs which tend to reappear throughout their fiction, in the hope of inspiring a more detailed study of S-F in Spain. JANET DIAZ PEREZ, Texas Tech University, "Manuel de Pedrolo and Science Fiction in Cataluna." Manuel de Pedrolo (b. 1918) is the author of over seventy volumes of poetry, drama, short stories, and especially novels. That Pedrolo is little known in Spain is in part a result of Spanish politics under Franco, combined with the fact that he writes in Catalan, a "minority language." A significant contributor to the theater of the absurd, he has won Cataluna's most prestigious literary prizes for his novels, but his science fiction has received no attention. This paper will trace S-F themes or traits in novels which do not belong fully to the genre, and give greater emphasis to three novels and a volume of stories which do. 55 HUMOR IN FANTASY Suite 112 CHAIR: Walter Herrscher, University of Wisconsin, Green Bay. 31