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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 29
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 29. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1201.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 29. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1201

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 29, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1201.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 29
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_030.jpg
Transcript Sat. 9-10:30 Cont. characters/ politics/ mathematics/ sanity/ music/ style/ society; in Professional Foul, soccer/ politics/ philosophy/ academics/ characters. DAVID NIXON, Palm Beach Junior College, "Dimensions of Reflexiveness in Tom Stoppard's Travesties." An interplay between fixed and open attitudes toward meaning becomes the focus in Tom Stoppard's Travesties. The problem of meaning in the play is manifest in its many reflexive dimensions. Here we find a metaphor for an issue larger than yet not so far removed from the spotlights, the greasepaint, and the well-worn boards. LUCINA P. GABBARD, Eastern Illinois University, "Tom Stoppard: Escape Artist." Two principal functions of fantasy have been recognized as to escape from the here and now and to explore personal identity. Tom Stoppard's imaginative works perform these functions on two levels — fictional and personal. First, three of his little-known plays — If You're Glad I'll Be Frank, A Separate Peace, and Albert's Bridge — demonstrate the fanciful escapes of his characters and the lessons they learn about themselves and their worlds. Second, parallels between these plays and Stoppard's life mark them as personal flights of fancy by which he escapes and explores the perplexities of his private world. GORDON E. SLETHAUG, University of Waterloo, "Mirrors and Multiple Heroes: Lord Malquist and Mr. Moon." As Mr. Moon of Tom Stoppard's novel, Lord Malquist & Mr. Moon, brings some scotch whiskey to Lady Laura Malquist, who is just about to disprove his imagined impotency, he sees his reflection in the mirror: "At the top of the first flight of stairs was a pair of large, double doors painted cream with gilt mouldings...He opened them to a narrow gap and saw himself in a mirror opposite, looking at himself through a gap in a large pair of double doors painted lilac." This image, the doubling of Moon in the mirror, presents in miniature both the main idea and the fundamental structure of the novel — the guest for heroism by six characters, five of whom are in some ways the doubles of Moon. 52 SEXUALITY & FANTASY I: DEATH & FEMINISM Allamanda Room CHAIR: Donald Palumbo, Northern Michigan University. DAVID J. BOND, University of Saskatchewan, "The Function of Eroticism and Fantasy in the Fiction of Andre Pieyre de Mandiargues." Two apparently different strands of Andre Pieyre de Mandiargues' work, the fantastic and the erotic, are interwoven in his fiction, and both serve the same purpose: both are linked to an attempt, on the part of Mandiargues' characters, to escape the self, to loosen the bonds impressed by life on the individual. One of the obvious restraints on us is time, but Mandriargues presents sexual activity as something that suspends time. Also, he presents eroticism as a means of escaping personal identity, not into nothingness, but into the world of nature. The final escape comes with death; while aware that eroticism and death are inextricably bound together in the human consciousness and have clear similarities, Mandriargues depicts the erotic as the antidote to death. For him eroticism is, like the fantastic, a search for something beyond this life, for a dimension where we are liberated from the constraints of society, official doctrines, ideologies, and life itself. ANN R. MORRIS, Stetson University, "Death-Cunt-Prick Songs, Robert Coover, Prop." To judge by Robert Coover's two best books, it is not baseball but sexual fantasy that is the great American game. In The Universal Baseball Association, Inc., J. Henry Waugh, Prop. ana Pricksongs and Descants, Coover shows the sexual fantasizing of his characters, young and old, rich and poor, male and female. The Universal Baseball Association implies that baseball can be traced back to ancient religious and fertility rites. Thus sex, linked through baseball with religion, becomes part of existential man's answer to meaninglessness and death. Pricksongs and Descants explores further this possibility of using sexual fantasy to impose order on chaos and emptiness. In both books Coover is reaching through sexual fantasy to ultimate values. PATRICIA FRAZER LAMB, Westminster College, "The Romantic Myth and Transcendence: A Feminist Interpretation of the Kirk/Spock Bond." The Star Trek phenomenon has given rise to a genre of fan magazine that examines the relationship between Kirk and Spock through a psychic and sexual bonding that "mates" them. These "zines" constitute a modern form of the romantic novel, despite the fact that the psychic bond and homosexual relationship exists between two apparently ultra-masculine figures. Yet Spock plays the female role in two important respects: his is the object of discrimination as an alien, and he must suppress his protectiveness. And any traditional elements of a romantic story are intensified by an admixture of mysticism and The Kirk and Spock of these zines androgynous. Each is allowed to masculine and feminine each is a whole human being. And sacrifice their unique loved nor to sacrifice existentialism. are, in fact, express both characteristics; neither is required to identities in order to be the work that brings them together. Thus their relationship is romantically appealing but non-threatening to the professional woman. MARLEEN BARR, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, "Suzy McKee Charnas' Motherlines Exemplifies and Justifies the Permissive Portrayal of Sexuality in Feminist Science Fiction: Or, What's a Nice Character Like You Doing in a Plot Like This?" Not everyone will welcome a novel that depicts interracial lesbianism among women who mate with horses. Thus, it is useful to understand why these potentially disturbing plot elements are present in Charnas' Motherlines. The novel portrays an 30