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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 28
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 28. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1200.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 28. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1200

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 28, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1200.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 28
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_029.jpg
Transcript Caldwell is cinema's first vampiric vamp — a woman very much like her femme-fatale film-noir contemporaries — as icily, chillingly sexually aggressive as her more explicit cinematic sisters of the sixties and seventies. Session XI, Saturday, 9 -10:30 a. m. LEONARD G. HELDRETH, Northern Michigan University, "Fred Saberhagen's Variations on Dracula." Saberhagen's novels detail Dracula's new escapades over a period of almost a century. In resuscitating Stoker's villain, Saberhagen modifies him to reflect contemporary conflicts and transforms the arch vampire into a vigorous old man who moves smoothly through the modern world, pursuing only his own interests unless antagonized. While maintaining many of the traditional vampire characteristics, the new Dracula prefers animal blood to human, is merely weakened by the sun, and is no longer a devilish figure who can be warded off by crucifixes, garlic, holy water, or the host. AUTHORS' READINGS Sandpiper Room 9 a.m. TERENCE GREEN, reading "Susie Q' u Terence M. Green, BA, BEd, MA, was born in Toronto, Canada in 1947, where he still resides. His SF stories have appeared in the anthologies Alien Worlds, Other Worlds, Aurora: New Canadian writing 1979, and in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. Critical work has appeared in Fiction such places as Science Commentary, Books in Canada, and others. 10 a.m. Review, SF 50 THE NUMINA IN MODERN FANTASY Room 118 CHAIR: Roger C. Schlobin, Purdue University. GARY K. WOLFE, Roosevelt University, "What is a Numina?" The author of the Eaton-Award-winning The Known and the Unknown will discuss the history and definitions of the concept of "numina" in a variety of disciplines, including theology, philosophy, psychology, and literature. JULES ZANGER, Southern Illinois University, "Numina as Technology: The Disenchantment of Magic." A sociological approach to the "new" centrality of magic and its practitioners in nineteenth- and twentieth-century British and American literature that examines the role of industrial-scientific culture in threatening and supporting the artist. This paradoxical combination of forces creates a literature in which magic and the magician, rather than Everyman, are critical to the action and resolution. This is a change from magic as a threatening, immoral force, which was usually background to the story, to an evil or good force whose attainment is the critical key to the plot. FRITZ LEIBER, reading an excerpt from his forthcoming autobiography, Not Much Disorder and Not So Early Sex, (title inspired by Mann's "Disorder and Early Sorrow.") Fritz Leiber, a Special Guest of the Conference, is perhaps the only author to win both Hugo and Nebula Awards in the same year on three separate occasions. Fritz has also garnered Gandalf, August Derleth, Lovecraft, and the Nebula Grand Master Awards. Best known among fantasy fans for his continuing series of sword and sorcery stories (six volumes, now) starring Fafhrd and The Grey Mouser, Fritz has also written classic science fiction, including The Wanderer, the culminating volume of his "Change War" story series The Big Time, and gothic horror novels in a modern setting like Our Lady of Darkness and the now classic Conjure Wife, which has • been filmed twice and adapted for television. Nevertheless, as coiner of the term "sword and sorcery," Fritz's popular identity lies with fantasy, and his Swords of Lankhmar has often been called "the best modern heroic fantasy." 51 FANTASY IN THE WORK OF TOM STOPPARD PART II Seagrape Room CHAIR: Howard Pearce, Florida Atlantic University. Film: BLACK MOON Coral Ballroom 10:00-11:32 p.m. 1975, International. Directed by Louis Malle. "To me, dreams are very real, very precise," Louis Malle has said, and rarely has a dream-world been delineated with such clarity as in Black Moon. A compelling mixture of science fiction, ancient myths, Lewis Carroll, Indian mysticism, Cocteau-like surrealism, and playful avant-gardism out of Malle's own Zazie, this self described "dream of a dream" is all the more haunting and magical for the matter-of-factness with which the most outrageous conceits are presented. In English and various unknown languages. JOSEPH J. FEENEY, S. J., Saint Joseph's University, "Fantasy in Structure: The Layers of Metaphor in Jumpers, Every Good Boy Deserves Favor, and Professional Foul." Fantasy is usually structured informally, but Tom Stoppard tightly constructs fantastic metaphors and uses these (together with plot) as the very structure of his plays. These complex layers of metaphor continue throughout a play, and each element of the comparison illuminates and is illuminated by the others. Fantasy in structure is provided by these bizarre metaphors: in Jumpers, philosophy/ gynmastics/ sex/ aceademic-chairs/ politics/ murder/ parties/ astronauts/ love/ slapstick/ characters; in EGBDF, 29