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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 26
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 26. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1198.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 26. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1198

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 26, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1198.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 26
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_027.jpg
Transcript CHAIR: Grant Crichfield, University of Vermont. 6 p.m. -i- CAROLYN RHODES, Old Dominion University, "Method in Their Madness: Feminism in 'Crazy' Utopian Visions." Two works which dramatize the visionary journeys of alienated women to better futures are "Your Faces, Oh My Sisters, Your Faces Filled with Light," by James Triptree, Jr. (Alice Sheldon) and Woman on the Edge of Time by Marge Piercy. The dreads and yearnings of the seer-protagonists serve to convey the authors' analyses of current social horrors as well as projected alternatives. Both of the fantasized futures present new gender roles as key elements in achieving Utopian peace and plenty. Such sympathetic projections of madness as vision and conformity as oppression show parallels to certain psychiatric critiques of contemporary life, saliently R. D. Laing's. LAWRENCE R. BROER, University of South Florida, "Though This be Madness, Yet There is Method in it: Narrative Strategy in Vonnegut's Sirens of Titan." Critics who call Vonnegut "pessimistic" fail to see the essential meaning of his narrative strategy which undercuts the defeatism of his characters. Sirens of Titan is more the story of Malachi's adoption of existential awareness and his return to psychic wholeness than it is the story of his madness. He finally realizes that the Tralfamadorians and all the other imagined mechanistic forces of control in the novel are merely projections of his own spiritual potential for creating a heaven or a hell of the actual world. He learns that with a little imagination he can dismantle his own self-imprisoning machinery and become whatever he chooses. Session X, Friday, 4 - 5:30 p. m. AUTHORS' READINGS Sandpiper Room 4 p.m. SPECIAL SESSION, "Is There A Theory of Fantasy?" Panelists: SAMUEL R. DELANY, KEYNOTE SPEAKER, author and critic; Katherine McClenahan, Marquette University; Gary K. Wolfe, Roosevelt University; Tom Moylan, University of Wisconsin, Waukesha. 5 p.m. JOE FRANCAVILLA, reading "Memory of Maida," a science fiction story about an unwilling mortal. Joe Francavilla teaches creative writing at SUNY, Buffalo, belongs to both SFWA and SFRA, and has published in Cinefantastique, Leighdt, Ethos, New Dimensions 10, and Science Fiction: The Transcendent Adventure. His first book of fiction is tentatively titled Vanishing Point. GREGORY FROST, reading "MacDatho's Pig," an Irish fantasy. Greg Frost is another Clarion graduate, whose first story, "In the Sunken Museum," appeared last year in The Twilight Zone. He is at present working on a two volume novel based on ancient Irish myth. Frost is also an artist, and does custom-designed T-shirts for Gene Wolfe and others. 46 THE THEATRUM MUNDI MOTIF AND THE FANTASTIC Seagrape Room CHAIR: Howard Pearce, Florida Atlantic University. PETER MALEKIN, University Mundi Motif, the Play Fantastic in Shakespeare." of Durham, "The Theatrum within a Play, and the The various devices exploring the theatrum mundi metaphor in Shakespeare's plays constitute a system of multiple mirrors implicating the audience reflects involved affects, audience Objectively, this system of mirrors the psychological and social issues in playing a role in life. And it subjectively, the ways in which an is aware, its mode of consciousness, not merely what it is conscious of. Whereas As You Like It, for instance, demonstrates the objective manifestation of the motif, the great tragedies probe it through the very consciousness of the audience. ENRICO QUARTO, Barry College, Conscious Madness." "The Carnival of Luigi Pirandello's Enrico Quarto dramatizes the evasiveness of the phenomena we perceive as reality. The pageant and role playing embody Pirandello's concerns over appearance and reality, and with Henry IV's madness the pageant becomes an enduring reality, insanity becomes sanity. Indeed, Henry IV is superior to his sane companions in force of personality, in his insights into himself and his companions. The "sane" companions' attempt to force Henry IV back to reality by re-enacting the pageant only produces multiple layers of confusion and sets the stage for the final regression into the fantasy of madness. FRANCIS GILLEN, University of Tampa, '"Horror Shows, Inside and Outside my Skull': Theatre and Life in Tennessee Williams' The Two Character Play." In a play by Tennessee Williams which he alternately entitled Outcry and The Two Character convention the Play, Williams uses the play-within the play to suggest of the limits of rational control over the fantastic demons of our minds. And as Calderon questioned what is life and what is dream, so Williams uses the convention to blur the boundaries between theatre and experience. 47 HAWTHORNE, II Room 108 27