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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 24
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 24. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1196.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 24. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1196

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 24, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1196.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 24
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_025.jpg
Transcript Although Truman Capote maintains that he does not like critics to identify him with his characters, his fiction begs for such a treatment. A recent story such as "Dazzle," and Other Voices, Other Rooms, the novel of thirty-five years ago that made him famous, each displays Capote's obsession with his own growth to "maturity." Whether that "maturity" is something Capote fully understands, or accepts is an issue which this paper confronts. VERA F. GOLINI, University of Waterloo, "Mussolini as Dante's Vergil: Anatomy of a Parody." CARL B. YOKE, Kent State University. Rebirth in the Works of Joan Vinge." "Death and The paper studies first the science fiction Inferno (L. develops along lines simil Inferno. Next, an attempt why the authors have given Be analogous to that of Vergil, dwells on the very comica multifarious parodies whi entertaining work a kind transcendent order." manner in which the Niven and J. Purnell) ar to those of Dante's is made at exploring nito Mussolini a role Finally, the paper 1 elements and the ch give this very of "lunacy of a 41 USES OF THE DEATH AND REBIRTH MOTIF IN MODERN FANTASY Room 108 CHAIR: Donald Palumbo, Northern Michigan University. THOMAS J. MORRISSEY, State University of New York, and Richard Wunderlich, College of St. Rose, Albany, "Death and Rebirth in Pinocchio." Carlo Collodi accommodates the harsher facts of mortal existence in his picaresque novel The Adventures of Pinocchio by using the archetypal birth-death-rebirth motif as a means of growth to responsible success of the puppet's metamorphic But on the structuring his hero's boyhood. Of course, the growth is rendered in terms of his rebirth as a flesh and blood human. road to rebirth Pinocchio suffers setbacks that are themselves symbolic deaths and resurrections. Furthermore, along the way he joins the ranks of Odysseus, Aeneas, and Hamlet by getting information and advice from the world beyond; beneath the book's comic-fantasy texture lies a symbolic journey to the underworld from which Pinocchio emerges whole—death and rebirth through infernal descent as well as death and rebirth through metamorphosis. MARILYN J. KURATA, University of Alabama, Birmingham. "Deliberate Transgression: Death and Rebirth as a Structural Motif in Herbert Read's The Green Child." The imaginative variety of Herbert Read's The Green Child can bewilder as well as charm, provoking the accusation that Read the novelist ignored the principle that Read the art critic so fervently upheld — the supremacy of organic form. Aside from the figure of Olivero, the protgonist, one connection among the novel's three disparate parts is the death and rebirth motif, communicated through appropriate images. Deliberate transgression as a structural device also accounts for the tripartite form with its varied tones, settings, and narrative concerns. Hans Christian Anderson's "The Snow Queen" holds the key to interpreting much of what Joan Vinge tries to do in her writings. A perfect illustration of what happens psychologically in Vinge's stories, this fairy tale delineates the death of an old self, the passage into and through a period of alienation, and the birth of a new, more mature personality. To support and emphasize the devlopmental pattern of her characters, who often also pass through a period of alienation to a subsequent rebirth of a Vinge frequently employs and reinforces it with symbols and motifs. more mature personality, a vegetation archetype several other devices, MARGARET MCDONALD, Regis College, Denver. Myth in Sam Shepard's Buried Child." "Uses of Buried Child is built upon a mythic narrative of the death of the corn spirit and the rebirth of new life as its concomitant. Shepard's use of this primitive legend lends his 1978 work a stronger dramatic structure than the earlier plays possessed and brings it much closer to a realistic evocation of American family life. Shepard does not re-tell the primitive folk myth in modern setting, but he does re-enact several of the old rituals to lend an aura of mystery and terror to his tragedy. For instance, in some primitive enactments of the ancient Egyptian myth of Osiris the fertility god, strangers were bound in a bundle of corn sheaves and tormented. Shepard weaves such mythic rituals into his weird tale of death and rebirth on an Illinois farm. 42 FANTASY IN GERMAN ROMANTICISM Room '110 CHAIR: Heidi E. Faletti, The Behrend College, Pennsylvania State University. DONALD H. CROSBY, University of Connecticut, Storrs. "Between Two Worlds: Robert Schumann and German Romanticism." . During the Romantic era German poets and thinkers found themselves under the spell of a kindred art: music. Whereas scholars have amply documented the influence of music on Romantic poetry and prose, little attention has been given to that of Romantic literature on German music. Robert Schumann supplies a striking example of a musician whose moods and themes show parallels to Romantic prose and poetry. In his piano music Schuman finds inspiration in visions of the nocturnal, the hallucinatory and the fantastic. This paper draws specific comparisons betreen the "night-side" of romanticism and Schumann's music. D. L. ASHLIMAN, University of Pittsburg. "Fantasy Sex-Role Reversals in Grimm's Fairy Tales." Grimms' Fairy Tales are for the most part the creations of numberless generations of women entertaining their families, and giving expression to their fears, hopes, wishes, frustrations. Some of the most fantastic, otherworldly elements in these tales can be shown to be symbolic rejections 25