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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 22
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 22. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1194.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 22. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1194

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 22, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1194.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 22
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_023.jpg
Transcript I 0 1 the two cycles of legends to explain: 1) the manner in which de Rais was turned into "Bluebeard," and 2) the true sources of Perrault's tale, native folklore originating in Brittany, the Vendee and the Loire valley. RICHARD BERCHAN, University of Utah, "How the Muses Came to the Rescue of Paul Claudel." Paul Claudel's ode Les Muses is a 642-line poem written at the turn of the century. This paper aims to reveal it as a battleground for a major conflict between the poet's religious and poetic vocations. Following a mystical experience in December, 1886, which he called his "conversion," Claudel was tormented by the need to go to the limit of this summons by becoming a priest. On the other hand, he was also a great poet and had an overpowering need to let the poet in him survive. He could not, he felt, be both poet and priest, and the battle between these two vocations is located, though not explicitly, within the text of Les Muses. 37 CHILDHOOD AND FANTASY Suite 112 CHAIR: Richard Kopley, Walden School, New York City. MARK BERNHEIM, Miami University, "The Five Hundred Reasons of Isaac Singer. Isaac Singer's children's literature represents an important part of his entire literary imagination, and stems to a large degree from similar sources. Singer himself has emphasized the childlike qualities of much of his adult fiction, and lines between the two genres are at times difficult to determine. Much material exists similarly in both, and we will note the tendencies which unite his writing for children and adults along parallel insights. Specific stories will be examined to reveal Singer's interest in the naive imagination. MARY E. SHANER, Massachusetts University - Boston Harbor, "The Matter of Britain in Contemporary Children's Fantasy." Arthurian legend is a virtual mother lode of adult fantasy for the English-speaking world; witness the range of adult Arthurian fantasies from The Faerie Queen to The Once and Future King. Curiously, however, the Matter of Britain has not been drawn on so extensively in modern children's fantasies nor even so successfully. By examining the use of Arthurian materials in three fantasies for children, The Weathermonger by Peter Dickinson The Earthfasts by William Mayne, and Silver on the Tree by Susan Cooper, one can draw some conclusions about how such material best functions in fantasy writing for children, and also about the value of Arthurian materials in books for the contemporary child. 38 OF TIME AND FUTURE HISTORY Suite 116 CHAIR: Justin Leiber, University of Houston. JAMES GARSON, University of Houston, "How is Time Travel Possible?" Many accounts of time travel in science fiction are inconsistent. Following the logic of a story, for example, you can show that the same thing both did and did not happen. However, many other stories present consistent pictures of time travel. In this paper, I will present three ways of working out a consistent story about time travel, resolving the Grandfather Paradox (what happens if I go back and kill my grandfather?) to illustrate how potential inconsistencies can be avoided in each of the three ways. These models of time travel, however, put strains on such basic concepts as the immutability of the past, our freedom to make choices, and even the nature of time travel itself. Each model sets up strains in different places, but some distort our concepts so much that I wonder whether they really count as time travel after all. CRAIG WALLACE BARROW, University "Pychohistory and the Utopias Foundation Series." of Tennessee, of Asimov's The primary action developed in Asimov's Foundation series is psychological, but it is the evolving psychology of cultures rather than of individuals, chiefly dealing with political and economic power. This paper analyzes the Utopian sentiments within this psychological evolution. JUSTIN LEIBER, University of Houston, "The I's Mind, an Attempt to Indistinguish Literature, Philosophy, and Science." These days, we are prone to scepticism about literature's traditional role of conveying truths about the universe and our place in it. Our mistrust of literature would seem to stem from 1) Whorfian, structural-linguistics views about human language, 2) laboratory-experimental and behaviorist views about ^'objective truth," 3) a background empiricist view about non-experimental studies such as mathematics. But all of these views now seem clearly discredited. With the fall of these views, the possibility that literature should hold out important truth seems once again established and better than before. This view might be illustrated by considering the recent Hofstadter-Dennett book, The Mind's I. R. LANCE FACTOR, Knox College, Illinois. "The Time Travel Paradox and Its Lesson." In backtracking time travel stories it is possible for characters to change the past. In a paradoxical backtracking story there is no difference between the possible and the impossible: anything can happen. More interesting is consistent backtracking of which there are two kinds: (1) the Heinlein-Lewis restricted plot with one or more closed causal loops where personhood is a matter of sequential time; (2) the Fritz Leiber extra-dimensionality sort in which memory constitutes personality and agencies operate beyond the causal loops of ordinary time. The forms exemplify different views about determinism, identity, history. • 39 REVISITING POSSIBLE WORLDS: RESOURCE MATERIALS IN FANTASTIC LITERATURE Room 118 23