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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 21
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 21. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1193.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 21. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1193

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 21, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1193.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 21
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_022.jpg
Transcript Fri. 11-12:30 Cont. GABRIELLE ROBINSON, Indiana University, South Bend, "Leap-Frogging from Lord Malquist and Mr. Moon to Dogg's Hamlet, Cahoot's Macbeth." Tom Stoppard's farcical games not only blur distinctions between the stage and reality; they are also menacing. Disorder and ambiguity foil attempts at making a comfortable, ordered reality, and these disruptions are, for Stoppard, "ambushes." Characters might become detectives or artists in trying to understand or control their worlds, and language itself becomes implicated in their endeavors. As a character who cannot gain control might resort to violence, so language can become a weapon. PAUL DELANEY, Westmont College, Incredible Jumpers Coda." "And Now the In Tom Stoppard's original plan for Jumpers, the philosophy symposium (now the fantasy "Coda") constituted the entire second act. A departure into the world of fantasy, the original version of this Coda provides insights for an understanding of the play. Tarzan and other characters point up the central argument about relativistic versus absolute moral values; George, on the side of absolutes, wins, though he cannot act accordingly. 00 LEONARD G. HELDRETH, Northern Michigan University, "The Shifting Nature of 'Reality' in Stoppard's Plays." Tom Stoppard's plays start with one reality, shift slowly as the play progresses, and then return (sometimes) to the original reality (illusion?) sometimes with a new interpretation of it. For example, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead moves back and forth between the reality of Hamlet and the world of R. and G.; further, in After Marriage, the apparent absurdity at the beginning of the play turns out to be perfectly logical, but the external reality, which should be logical, is completely absurd. 35 TRANSFORMATION AND THE FANTASTIC Room 108 CHAIR: J.P. Telotte, Georgia Institute of Technology. RAND BOHRER, Georgia Institute "Reverse Metamorphosis: Theme of Gawain and the Green Knight" of Technology, Regeneration in We tend to think of metamorphosis as an unnatural process, a fantastic violation of the normal order of things, a crossing of boundaries based on intelligible, even absolute categories of form that are synonymous with the ultimate nature of things. However, the phenomenon of metamorphosis is not necessarily limited to the unnatural or concerned with the fantastic. Broadly speaking, the subject of metamorphosis, considered as a category of being, is contiguous with the ancient domain of natural philosophy, that is, the field of wisdom that deals with that which moves and changes. DAVID N. REDMAN, Princeton University, "Metamorphosis by Gold: Money and Man in Renaissance Drama." A reading of Karl Marx's Economics and Philosophical Manuscripts and the first volume of Capital evokes powerful resonances of the English Renaissance, for Marx quotes extensively from Shakespeare's Timon of Athens. If we turn to this play and others by Shakespeare's contemporaries, we can note a deep moral concern for an essentially modern problem— the transformative effects of money on human character and society. Timon, like Marlowe's Jew of Malta and Jonson's Volpone, explores through the image of gold both the creative and decreative aspects of metamorphosis, and in the process describes the conditions of emergence of the modern world from the old. J.P. TELOTTE, Georgia Institute Transformative Vision: Val Perspective of Horror." of Technology, "A Lewton and the The conclusion of that modern horror classic Night of the Living Dead, demonstrates what happens when we perceive our fellowman in the wrong way; he can be mistaken for a monster and our desire to help can be transformed into an impulse for destruction. This paper explores that transformative motif in the horror genre, particularly its relation to distorted perspective. In films like The Cat People, The Leopard Man, Isle of the Dead, and The Body Snatchers, Lewton demonstrated how a distorted perspective often becomes a sort of murderous glance which ultimately transforms the viewer into just the sort of monstrous presence he so deeply fears. 36 MONSTERS AND MYTHOLOGY: FRENCH LITERATURE AND THE FANTASTIC Room 110 CHAIR: Lillian Bulwa, Northeastern University. KENNETH RIVERS, Kansas State University, "Man Into Monster: Caricature in Balzac and the Cartoonists of His Time." Caricature, in both literature and visual art, involves such techniques as distortion, exaggeration, and substitution, whereby human figures may be metamorphosed into monstrous forms, often for satirical purposes. In the 1820's and 1830's, the novelist Balzac and various pictorial caricaturists, most notably Daumier, collaborated to create France's greatest epoch of caricature. The processes by which man is converted into monster— and sometimes back again— reveal a great deal about the relative nature of written and visual types of satire, and also help illuminate our understanding of the culture as a whole. RADU FLORESCU, Boston College, "Bluebeard: Historical Legend or Myth?" Popular confusion of Gilles de Rais, a seducer and murderer of young boys who was executed in 1440, with the wife-murderer "Bluebeard" of Perrault's 17th century fairy tale, is a problem for folklorists. This paper attempts to disentangle » 22