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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 19
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 19. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1191.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 19. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1191

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 19, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1191.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 19
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_020.jpg
Transcript Fri. 9 -10:30 Cont. 31 sixteenth century gone mad; and Generalissimo Franco, respectively. the death of CONSTANCE D. MARKEY, Loyola University, "A Concept of Birth and Rebirth: Somewhere in Time." recent film, Somewhere in Time (Szwarc/Universal, 1980), explores the ancient, even primordial,, religious myth of the eternal return with its comforting, cyclical concept of history and its reassurance of man's rebirth and immortality. As an expression of the primevel drama, the film, like one of its earlier precursors Kubrick's 2001. A Space Odyssey, manifests man's deepest desire that his world, or some positive aspect of it, will always be here. In a more romantic Nietzschean vein, the film allegorizes the modern overman's will to surmount the limitations of mortal bonds. 30 FANTASY IN LATIN AMERICAN FICTION Room 110 CHAIR: P.A. Pardinas-Barnes, Georgetown University. MORTON P. LEVITT, Temple University, "The Fantastic Ordinariness of Three Trapped Tigers." What makes the famed Magic Realism of current Latin American fiction so extraordinary is not so much the events it describes as the lens through which it sees those events, a lens which assures us that these incredible affairs are, in fact, really mundane. It is this combination of the ordinary and the fantastic which distinguishes this from all other fictions. Guillermo Cabrera Infante's Three Trapped Tigers illustrates wonderfully the unique union of vision and event, of politics and language, of indigenous (Cuban) and borrowed (Joycean) sources which characterizes the most vital and challenging fiction of our day. MICHAEL CAP0BIANC0, St. John's University, "Statistical Experiments with Hopscotch." In Hopscotch Julio Cortazar anticipated to some extent the idea he brought to fruition in "62: A Model Kit," namely, that of allowing the reader a certain amount of freedom in choosing the book he wishes to read, i.e., becoming a "reader-participant," a "reader-coauthor." Four experiments with this novel, carried out in this spirit, are described, two of them involving statistical sampling of chapters. P. A. PARDINAS-BARNES, Georgetown University, "Fuentes' Fantastic Witches: 'Aura' and Other Short Fiction." Carlos Fuentes' interpretation of the feminine mystique through magic is readily found in "Aura" and some of his other short fiction. An analysis of certain characters shows Fuentes' vision of the fantastic. 20 MODERN VISION IN BLACK AND WHITE LINES Suite 112 CHAIR: Joan Digby, C.W. Post College MARTHA SUTHERLAND, University of Arkansas, "Aubrey Beardsley: Art and Fantasy." Aubrey Beardsley is known to the world as a master of black and white design who held an unwelcome mirror up to the vices of his age. In his short life art and illness were the only realities: the images they produced mocked the righteous and repressive Victorian reality. He was also a writer, and this paper will explore some of the ways in which the fantasies that he wrote about became the fantasies he drew about, which became the fantasy by which he lived and died. HEIDI E. FALETTI, Pennsylvania State University, Behrend College, "The Lines of Beardsley and Letcher with the Words of Wilde and George." Turn-of- sensuous colors, These su combinat as, for illustra Wilde's illustra cycles interact the-century Art Nouveau offers emphasis on surface elements of design, such as lines, words, and musical Leitmotifs. rface elements bring about the Gesamtkunst ion of different mediums with each other, example, painting and architecture or tion and poetry. Beardsley's sketches for Salome and Melchior Lechter's tions for some of Stefan George's lyric demonstrate such a dynamic decorative ion. JOHN DIGBY, "Working in Black and White: View." A Personal Collage is a medium closely linked to texts and for that reason is strongly rooted in origins of black and white. The roots of collage are also political, stemming from a conscious rebellion against art. This talk will present a personal view of collage as a form (first linked to my poetry) that I choose to explore purely in black and white, a medium which derives in imagery from engravers such as Samuel Palmer, Gustave Dore, and Harry Fenn. 32 ORDER AND THE FAILURE OF FANTASY/FILM Suite 116 CHAIR: Richard E. Hersh, University of Florida. PHIL KUHN, University of Florida, "The Love of Characterization: How the Image is Subordinated in Blake Edwards' JO. In choosing JK) for the title of a movie, Blake Edwards sets forth an ideal for the movie viewer, a hierarchy for the moving color image based strictly on the conceptual rigors of the mind. In contrast, the motion and color of Bo Derek's image defy naturally these categorizations. There is, moreover, a tension in the movie resulting from Derek's image's freedom and Edwards' and Dudley Moore's subordination ultimately of its powers to a grand idea of life itself. The tension comes to a climax in the aborted lovemaking scene between Derek and Moore, a scene which shows that the