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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 17
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 17. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1189.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 17. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1189

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 17, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1189.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 17
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_018.jpg
Transcript Thurs. 4-5:30 Cont. fantasy. Whether on the level of narrative technique, imagery, or of the larger thematic structure, fantasy plays a central role in defining and refining the questions Becker and his characters ask of life: What is hope? Where, after Auschwitz—or after Lodz, in this case—, can one draw the line between truth and deceit? My thesis is that by virtue of the "uses of enchantment," to borrow Bettelheim's concept, Becker offers a unique contribution to the wave of postwar German "Bewaeltigungsliteratur" which attempts to come to terms wih realities of the holocaust. 26 FANTASY IN THE WORK OF HERMANN HESSE Suite 112 CHAIR: Robert Schwarz, Florida Atlantic University. KURT J. FICKERT, Wittenberg University, "The Mystery of Hesse's Glass Bead Game." Like the symbols of the chessboard game and the organization of the immortals in Per Steppenwolf and the amalgamation of H.H. and Leo and the League of Travelers in Die Morgenlandfahrt, the symbols of the glass bead game and its players, the Castalians, relate to Hesse's preoccupation with the arts, particularly the literary arts. The glass bead game thus becomes the most subtle representation of his creativity. He depicts writing as an activity which properly occurs in the realm of the Geist, that is, Castalia, and then analyzes its exact nature. It is a game, play — not a purposeful endeavor. It is imagination itself. MAUREEN SCHEIWE, alumna, Florida Atlantic University, "Hesse and the Search for the Beloved." There is a prevailing quest throughout the work of Herman Hesse for the recognition and reconciliation of opposing forces within the self, the Seele (soul) and the Geist (intellect), that culminates in the healing and "whole-ing" of the self. The arduous journey to the self ultimately must be walked alone. It is Hesse's use of symbols which is a key to unlocking the mysteries of soul. For Hesse, the primordial mother symbol, as revealed in Frau Eva in Demian, illuminates the feminine principle, associated fundamentally with the maternal element in life, with the womb, with chaos, with emotion, out of which the creative instincts are born. Another key to transformation is the use of humor, as in Steppenwolf. Tragedy is turned into comedy. It is the going up after the coming down and faith is restored. The search for the beloved is not the search for "The Other," but ultimately the search for the "other" within ourselves which brings wholeness. HEIDI E. FALETTI, Pennsylvania Behrend College, "The Parabolic Morgenlandfahrt." State University, Vision of Hesse' given parabolic form in Hesse's Morgenlandfahrt. This paper explores the breakdown of spiritual awareness which parallels the disintegration of a collective "journey to the East." Secondly, it concentrates on how the loss of memory hinders the narrator's fictional reconstruction of the journey. Thirdly, it analyzes his insight into the need to subordinate his disjointed life to a higher aesthetic principle, embodied by the journey's servant, Leo. These three dimensions constitute a parable of the modern quest for unifying values and redemption from a dehumanized, fragmented existence. 27 ORDER AND THE FAILURE OF FANTASY FICTION Suite 116 CHAIR: Richard E. Hersh, University of Florida. PETER BRIGG, University of Guelph, "The Disorder of Fantastic Order." Some modern fantastic fiction has taken an explosively paradoxical approach towards the traditional view of art as suggesting the formal structure of reality. Explications of the pattern and meaning of human life become more and more frenzied, zany, and paranoid. Two fantastic extravaganzas, Boris and Arkady Strugatsky's Definitely Maybe and Salman Rushdie's Booker Prizewinning Midnight's Children, demonstrate how the assertion of rigid systems produces comedy, satire, enchantment, and internal, artistic order, but inverts its own ostensible goal of demonstrating the order of reality. STEPHEN ROBITAILLE, University of Florida, "Vulcan Revisited: Kenneth Patchen's The Journal of Albion Moonlight." Kenneth Patchen called his Journal of Albion Moonlight an attempt to deal with the insanity and chaos of "the plague summer of 1941." This work has been variously labeled as an anti-novel, surrealistic, disordered and a precursor to more recent post-modernist art. But such analyses have failed to address Patchen's unique employment of structural devices that subvert the fantastic, only to suggest the more fantastic possibilities that exist beyond the text itself. Certain deconstructive elements of the novel, while depicting Dark Kingdom, ultimately force the reader to enter a strange borderland in which the text, in rendering itself unreadable, discovers nothing but itself, thus surpassing the negativity suggested by earlier, more traditional "readings." MELISSA E. BARTH, DePauw University, "Necessary Chaos: The Function of Disorder in Fantasy." A modernistic effort to recapture an almost forgotten quest for absolute artistic values is The disjuncture that occurs and reader's expectations do no responsible for producing literature. What might be c fantasy" includes texts such surreal, and the absurd that and incongruities in orde fantasies. Without this chara these texts would no longer be texts ask their reader to par when textual events t coincide is often the fantastic in ailed "polymorphous as metafiction, the depend on disorder r to function as cteristic ambiguity, fantasies. These ticipate in a search 18