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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 15
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 15. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1187.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 15. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1187

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 15, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1187.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 15
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_016.jpg
Transcript Thurs. 2-3:30 Cont. common. In fact, the cliche provides precisely the same sorts of stability, impetus to questioning, and ultimate reassurance in the face of overwhelming change that science fiction does. If science fiction, as a genre, is prone to being cliched, that tendency then, is no fault, but rather an element inherent in the genre. H.J. SCHULZ, Vanderbilt University, "Science Fiction Criticism and Some Principles of an American-German Dialog." Since the early 1950's German interest in science fiction has increased steadily, as evidenced both in publications and in the classroom. But in contrast to similar developments in the U.S., this process does not entail a canonization of science fiction. Early formal and thematic concerns (Gerber to Hienger) have given way to ideological and sociological considerations with the result that the American attempt to integrate science fiction into mainstream categories is counteracted by a German critical movement which equates science fiction exclusively with its lowest commercial forms. Both positions rest on firm methodological bases; their mediation is therefore very much in order. Session VI, Thursday, 4-5:30 p.m. Film: TRANSFUSION Coral Ballroom 4:55-5:35 p.m. 1979, United States. Directed my Marc Huestis. With Gregory Cruikshank, Janice Sukitus. "Not just another vampire movie, this moody, Gothic psychodrama moves with the abrupt mercilessness of a nightmare from 17th century Salem, where same-sex affection is punishable by burning, to a contemporary Kafkaesque cityscape of loneliness and isolation." — Marc Huestis. Film: BEWARE OF A HOLY WHORE Coral Ballroom 10:00-11:43 p.m. 1970, West Germany. Directed By Rainer Werner Fassbinder. An autobiographical meditation on filmmaking in a class with 8 1/2, Contempt, an Day for Night. The action is set at a seaside luxury hotel where a movie cast and crew spend their spare time assaulting each other verbally, emotionally and sexually. These mangled people all hupe to be made complete by contact with the "holy whore": the cinema. AUTHOR'S READINGS Sandpiper Room 4 p.m. GARY ALAN RUSE, reading an excerpt from The Gods of Cerus Major. Gary Alan Ruse, a native of Miami, is a regular contributor to Analog, and the author of three novels, Houndstooth, A Game of Titans, and the recent Gods of Cerus Major, released in hardcover last January by Doubleday. He will read a selection from that. Gary has also illustrated several children's books. 5 p.m. C. BRUCE HUNTER, reading "A Frenzied Beat of Wings," from Other Worlds II. C. Bruce Hunter is a resident of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, where he is finishing a doctorate in education. He writes mysteries for Ellery Queen, Alfred Hitchcock and Mike Shane magazines, fiction in Jerry and has published Poumelle's Survival fantasy in elsewhere. science of Freedom Fantasy Book, anthology, Other Worlds, and and 6 p.m. CHARLES PLATT, reading "The Coldness." New Worlds, Charles Piatt, a veteran of author/editor/publisher of The Patchin Review, most controversial (notorious?) the field, is the author o classics as Garbage World, Planet and the magazine in of the Twilight of the City, lack of trouble," he Fantasy Newsletter. Voles, and "I pre says little f such scatological space operas like doomsday books like fer trouble to the in an interview in 22 IMAGINARY SOCIETIES AS SOCIAL CRITICISM Seagrape Room CHAIR: Terry M. Parssinen, Temple University. ANNETTE S. LEVITT, Phildelphia, "William Blake's Vision of America." During the years of the American Revolution William Blake's sympathies were clearly not those of his monarch, George III. Indeed, Blake idealizes America in several poems of the 1790s, personifying the young nation in his Visions of the Daughters of Albion, and glorifying its heroes in the poem entitled America. At the same time, he attacks England for its role in the slave trade, for its exploitation abroad and at home. In his poems and in their illustrations, Blake reviles the evils of the monarchy— of English society— as he creates an America of purit -,nd idealism. EDWARD HIRSCH, Wayne State University, "The Imaginary Peasant." Throughout the nineteenth century, but particularly in post-famine Ireland, there was an increasing interest in the rural customs and stories of the Irish country people. This interest deeply intensified— indeed it may be said that the Irish peasant was fundamentally "discovered" or "created" and his characteristics fixed for posterity— during the early years of the Irish Literary Revival. The idea of the primitive Irish 16