Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 14
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 14. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1186.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 14. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1186

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 14, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1186.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 14
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_015.jpg
Transcript 19 ITALIAN SCIENCE FICTION Room 110 CHAIR: Gaetano Cipolla, St. John's University. GAETANO CIPOLLA, St. John's University, "Italian Science Fiction: A Survey." Italian science fiction is surveyed from its beginnings to the present, outlining the major writers and their contributions. The evolution of Italian science fiction from its heavy reliance on foreign models to the development of an original style is traced. MARIO MIGNONE, State University of New York - Stony Brook, "G. Berto's Fantarca." Like many Italian writers who achieved success as novelists or poets before turning to "Fantascienze," G. Berto won renown with his Male Oscuro and entered science fiction with Fantarca, THERESA EPPRIDGE, College of Art and the Unseen Reality." New Rochelle, "Eskimo which reveals underlying themes and structures common with his other works. in PAOLO POSSIEDI, Montclair State College, "The Muse in Italian Science Fiction." acknowledged is examined employed and fiction and The work of Gilda Musa, one of the masters of Italian science fiction, from the point of view of the codes their relationship to science mainstream literatures. 20 ART FORMS AND THE FANTASTIC Suite 112 CHAIR: Donald Curl, Florida Atlantic University. J. RUSSELL REAVER, Florida State University. "The Grotesquery of Gormenghast: Mervin Peake's Castle" In this study I show how the peculiar grotesqueries of Gormenghast Castle exist in the uneasy balance between the fearful and funny as a kind of reflection of the subconscious repressions in Peake's responses to the castle's control over him. Peake retreated into the fantasy of ancient order and inflexible custom within the castle, but he remained at the mercy of non-human power becoming increasingly monstrous, relieved only by our ability to laugh at the extremely irrational behavior of the people living in Gormenghast Castle. By showing tensions between people and castle, this paper illustrates the horrors of subconscious conflicts we can escape from only momentarily through laughter. D. HAMPTON MORRIS, Auburn University, "Stephane Mallarme and the Cosmic Dance." This paper will investigate Mallarme's fascination with the ballet and attempt to show that the poet's conception of the dance was not that of the ordinary critic, for Mallarme viewed dancing as not just another beautiful art, but as a form of "Human Hieroglyphics," which, bypassing the normal channels of communication, reveals the mysteries of man and the cosmos. Mallarme's concept of the dance as an expression of occult knowledge fits well within the esoteric tradition. Eskimo spirit sculptures bring to life the old ways of seeing and the spirit traditions of a culture caught in the disruptive inroads of western ways. This paper considers some themes and visual expressions in the shamanic carvings of Spence Bay, Northwest Territories. Several of the works examined are by the Inuit carver, Karoo Ashevak. He is the foremost sculptor from this isolated area and his works are consistently "spirit" pieces. The ten slides that accompany this paper make visual the characteristics of the traditions discussed in the first part of this presentation. MARCILENE K. WITTMER, University of Miami, "Mbari: Spirit House of the Owerri Ibo (Nigeria)." The sacred space and time of a typical seance can be seen in the Mbari houses constructed by the Ibo of Nigeria and decorated in order to propitiate troublesome spirits and bring blessings to the community. Since a seance is a transient event, tangible evidence of its form seldom exists. This is what makes the Mbari house such a special document. This paper will trace the existence o Mbari from its inception in a divination process, through the various stages of execution, to its final abandonment to the elements. 21 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO SCIENCE FICTION II Suite 116 CHAIR: Robert Begiebing, New Hampshire College. ROBERT CROSSLEY, University of Massachusetts, "Etherial Ascents: Human 'Flight in Eighteenth Century Fiction." The ancient human desire to fly, whether by mechanical means or by physiological adaptation, is susceptible to a variety of literary treatments. Even in Paradise Lost Milton's angel Raphael suggests to Adam that winged flight may be the ultimate human mode of transportation, a natural development in human evolution. In eighteenth-century fiction Johnson's Rasselas and Robert Paltock's Peter Wilkins provide rich instances of the image of human flight in satire and romance, and offer rough and fascinating outlines of issues that would . become central in later works of science fiction, notable in Well's The War in the Air and Stapledon's Last and First Men. MICHAEL R. COLLINGS, Pepperdine University, "Science Fiction and the Cliche: The Sociology of Meaning and Function." The consensus of most science fiction critics is that the genre is essentially a development of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and reflects the needs and concerns of industrialized, bureaucratized, impersonalized society. Similar conclusions have been reached concerning the cliche. The parallels between the function of the cliche in modern society and the history and development of science fiction as a twentieth century genre, suggest that the two have much in 15