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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 13
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 13. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1185.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 13. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1185

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 13, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1185.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 13
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_014.jpg
Transcript Thurs. 2-3:30 Cont. MAURICE J. BENNETT, University of Maryland, "Art and Metaphysics in Edgar Allan Poe's 'Hans Pfaall.'" Poe's emphasis on scientific and technological plausibility in the endnote to "Hans Pfaall" essentially established the basic outlines of what would become science fiction. However, a close reading of the tale in terms of his entire oeuvre— critical as well as creative— reveals that his central project here is identical with that undertaken by many Romantics, a literary record of transcendent experience. "Pfaall" (1835) preceded Emerson's Nature (1836), so that in dramatizing the Romantic quest for imaginative consciousness, Poe became the first nineteenth-century American of significant literary stature to participate fully and unequivocally in the Spirit of the Age. 17 SAMUEL R. DELANY Allamanda Room CHAIR: Robert A. Collins, Florida Atlantic University. ANDREW GORDON, University of Florida. "Human-Machine Communion in Delany's Nova. 00 The novel attempts to balance deeprooted fears about machine takeover with speculation about new man-machine relationships, but the under-riding theme is the necessity for balance in the human psyche. Technology is a mixed blessing whose potential depends on the motives of the humans employing it. When machines become an extension of mankind, as in Nova, we are led to the inevitable question of what contitutes the human. Our attitudes about machinery really reflect our hopes and fears about ourselves. WILLIAM SCHUYLER, University of Louisville. Anyone Here Speak Babel-17?" "Could Delany's artificial language forces a mode of cognition on its speakers, one in which the distinction between self and other is deliberately obscured. The mode is a form of gestalt perception in which everything in one's experience is integrated into a unitary whole, analogous to the "picture theory of meaning" in philosophy. This mode lacks a mechanism for focusing attention, for directed reference. In this form of cognition, the perceiver IS the pattern he perceives, the whole gestalt. Thus the pattern perceived includes the information needed to alter any part of it, to solve any technical problem included in it. However, it is unlikely that human mental capacities are capable of the immensely detailed consciousness required for this mode of perception. ROBERT A. COLLINS, Florida Atlantic University. "Allegory in Delany's The Einstein Intersection." Among the several underlying structures of Delany's novel are a series of metaphors that may be read as a kind of ethnic allegory, in which the myths of mankind become the symbols of western culture, and the alien spirits locked uneasily into foreign bodies represent the black consciousness, alienated and dispossessed by its immersion in western culture. In this reading, Lobey's task is to exorcise the alien cultural matrix, first by re-enacting its myths, then by rejecting them. His refusal to revive Green-eye (Christ) implies rejection of the martyr/hero (Martin Luther King?) as an exemplum of racial consciousness. Similar, though more complex, allegorical structures appear in Dhalgren, another novel of the "sixties" experience (and its rhetoric). CHAIR: Walter Greenbay. CHRISTA-MARIE Bend, "The Tieck's The .18 ANIMALS AND THE FANTASTIC Room 108 Herrscher, University of Wisconsin, BEARDSLEY, Indiana University, South Sunbird in Novalis' Klingshor-Tale and Elves: Symbolism and Aesthetics — Poetry and Myth." During the period of German Romanticism the animal takes on a new dimension. It is vested with an "immortal soul." This phenomenon is first observed in the bird. In focusing on the Phoenix in Novalis' Klingsohr-Tale and Tieck's The Elves we shall show how through their presence these two birds reveal their soul and simultaneously enhance the fables aesthetically. Striking similarities between the two motifs suggest the influence of the Phoenix in Novalis' tale upon that portrayed by his close literary friend Tieck. BRUCE ROSS, State University New York, Buffalo, "The Atavistic Beast: Synagogue.'" Kafka's 'The Animal in the The wilderness in the form of animals of various kinds intrudes upon the majority of Kafka's stories, novels, notebooks, letters, and diaries. In one fragment, however, the collocation of a wild animal and an explicitly Judaic ritual complex is evoked. In "The Animal in the Synagogue" a marten-like creature inhabits the balcony area of a small syagogue for several generations. This paper will explicate the symbolic, anthropologic, and religious nature of the beast. JEAN TOBIN, University of Wisconsin, Sheboygan County, "Werewolves and Unicorns: Fabulous Beasts in Peter Beagle's Twentieth Century Fiction." In The Last Unicorn and Lila and the Werewolf, while retaining all the familiar elements of the traditional myth of the unicorn and the legend of the werewolf, Beagle is able to give his readers fresh, compelling contemporary fiction by placing his unicorn and his werewolves within a modern landscape, by putting them among characters who share our modern attitudes and reactions, and by allowing his narratives in themselves to be statements about the nature of myth in our time. 14