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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 12. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1184.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 12. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1184

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 12, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1184.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 12
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_013.jpg
Transcript to a polarization of good and evil forces, as opposed to the generalized moral squalor in the poem. The two authors also assign divergent values to the Fisher King's wound and to his waiting. The fact that Lewis often challenged Eliot leads to increased speculation about the different ways in which each author approaches the Medieval material common to the work of both. BRIAN MURPHY, Respondant. Oakland University, Michigan, Session V, Thursday, 2-3:30 p.m. Film: BEAUTY AND THE BEAST Coral Ballroom 1:25-3:00 p.m. 1946, France. Directed by Jean Cocteau. Scenario by Cocteau, based on the story by Mme. Leprince de Beaumont. Music by Georges Auric. With Jean Marais, Josette Day, Mila Parely, Marcel Andre, Michel Auclair. Beauty saves her father by giving herself to the beast. Because she loves him, he is transformed into a handsome prince. A sumptuous film fantasy, superbly photographed. The sets of Christian Berard contribute to the visual enchantment and Arakelian's make-up creations are splendid. One of Cocteau's greatest successes as a film maker. Film: MURDER IN 3-D Coral Ballroom 3:05-3:20 p.m. 1941, United States. Director unknown. In anaglyphic three-dimension (special glasses will be provided). "You'll SHRIEK as the FRANKENSTEIN MONSTER pours hot, molten lead right at your face! Then you'll SHRIEK AGAIN when he hurls the pot! These are just TWO of the 21 certified shocks in MURDER IN 3-D, a real, old-fashioned mystery mellerdrammer, with spooks, spiders, and skeletons that come right out at you! It's the greatest novelty in show business!" — Eric Spilker. Film: SON OF DRACULA Coral Ballroom 3:20-4:40 p.m. 1943, United States (Universal). Directed by Robert Siodmak. With Robert Paige, Louise Allbritton, Lon Chaney, Evelyn Ankers, Frank Craven, J. Edward Bromberg. "Robert Siodmak's Hollywood films were more Germanic than his German ones, and that is as it should be. Why should Germans want to look at Germanic films?" — Andrew Sarris. AUTHORS' READINGS Sandpiper Room 2 p.m. BARRY N. MALZBERG, reading "Icons" and "Chained." Barry Malzberg, faculty, is the collections and a member of our Writer's Workshop author of 27 sf novels, eight the recently published Engines of the Night: Science Fiction in the Eighties (Doubleday, 1982). A winner of the John W. Campbell Memorial Award in 1972 for Beyond Apollo, he is also a second violinist. 3 p.m. JACK DANN, reading "Going Under," a story selected for Terry Carr's Best Science Fiction of the Year anthology. Jack Dann's stories have appeared in Playboy Omni, Penthouse, Fantasy & Science Fiction, Qui, Gallery, Orbit, The Twilight Zone, and many other magazines and anthologies. He has published two novels, Starhiker and Junction, and a story collection, Timetipping. He has edited numerous anthologies, most recently More Wandering Stars. A resident of New York State, Dann has lectured on radio and television, and taught science fiction at Cornell. 16 THE FANTASTIC WORKS OF EDGAR ALLEN POE: PART I Seagrape Room CHAIR: Richard Kopley, Walden School. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN FISHER IV, Mississippi, "The Flights of The University of a Good Man's Mind: Fantasy in Poe's 'The Assignation.'" The "good man" of the title is Poe's narrator, in whom we discover a mind and viewpoint linked to the commonplace morality of the time. Limited as his sensibilities are—like those of the actual Thomas Moore—he can only envision earthly causes and effects in relation to the intense passion dramatized before him. His way of seeing things (and his perceptions are always fraught with the concrete obvious) is distorted. Such distortion makes for rich ambiguity throughout, and the fantasy substance achieves high art. Poe's use of the narrator's fantasies to advance and arrest the course of the "The Assignation" is a masterstroke, and one very often ignored. KENT LJUNGQUIST, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, "The Titan Myth and the Fantastic Endings of Poe's Pym and Melville's Pierre." Varied versions of the Titan myth were of particular interest to writers of the American Renaissance. This myth was, of course, treated by the British Romantics in a gallery of works: Shelley's Prometheus Unbound, Keats's Hyperion: a Fragment and The Fall of Hyperion, and Carlyle's The French Revolution and Sartor Resartus. These works were clearly "models" for American Romantics, as a number of works of the American Renaissance attest: Poe's The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym, Melville's Pierre, or The Ambiguities, and Longfellow's Hyperion. Elements of the Titan myth contribute to the fantastic conclusions o Pym and Pierre respectively. By focussing on source material provided by the so-called "speculative" mythologists— most notably Jacob Bryant, Francis Wilford, and Edward Davies— one can show the applicability of this complicated body of mythological data and antiquarian lore to two masterworks of American Romanticism. 13 fisift&iaileii&^l