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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 11
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 11. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1183.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 11. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1183

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 11, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1183.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_012.jpg
Transcript Thurs. 11-12:30 Cont. traditions surrounding the figure of the Sibyl: in art, as the ancient prophetess of the Gentiles; in literature, as the Queen of the earthly paradise, with reference to Andrea da Barberino's Guerino il Meschino, Michelangelo and other interpreters of the myth. WILLIAM E. LEPARULO, Florida State University, "Fantasy and Figurative Art in Boccaccio's and Pasolini's Decameron." Boccaccio's characters and places in the Decameron show a limited imagination for figurative arts. Pasolini's Decameron on the contrary displays a the surprisingly rich fantasy through reconstruction of famous paintings. cinematic Chagall's Fantastic Fables." Vision of La Fonatines' The illustrations of Marc Chagall are unique in any iconography study of La Fontaine's Fables. Traditional materials are handled with shades of feelings not to be found in earlier illustrations. In particular, Chagall's approach to animal depiction in the Fables is at variance with that of practically all the previous collections of fables that had found favor with the public. He is not so much interested in the morals of the stories as he is in the general spirit and feeing of the work. Thus, not only are his illustrations more humorous than his predecessors, but his exaggerated and fantastic interpretations of various animal types have never been surpassed. This is the reason why Chagall, more than any other artist, has truly captured the comic genius of La Fontaine. 14 FANTASTIC ANIMALS: COLLECTIONS OF BEASTS Suite 112 15 C.S. LEWIS: LANGUAGE, MYTH, FANTASY Suite 116 AND CHAIR: Joan Digby, C. W. Post College BERYL ROWLAND, New York University. "The Physiologus and its Relationship to the Hexameron of St. Basil." The Physiologus takes its material from many of the same sources as St. Basil, expanding it and making it the basis of extended Christian moralizations. Yet, despite a generous use of the same stereotypes, the differences between the two works are striking. St. Basil includes graphic analogies that are not applied to the same animals in the Physiologus or in the expanded version, the Bestiary. Whereas the writer of the Physiologus is indifferent to natural phenomena and is frequently more concerned with the sense of the allegory than its tenor, in St. Basil's Hexameron the scholar still looks at the real world and reflects on its marvels. Thus, the most conspicuous difference betwen St. Basil's treatment of the animal world and that of the compiler of the Physiologus lies in St. Basil's obvious enthusiasm for Nature. This enthusiasm gives rise to fresh, perceptive images, to specific details that bring the reader close to the world of Virgil's Georgics. DAVID L0CKW00D, Cumberland College, "A Comparative Study of Animal-Bird Imagery: Hieronymus Bosch and Francisco Goya Y Lucientes." This presentation will show Bosch's art combining Animal-Bird imagery, both real and fantastic, with non-secular motifs. It will demonstrate an underlying imagery heavily interlaced with Christian leonography, symbolic allusion, popular beliefs and conceptions of the Medieval. In comparison, this presentation will discuss Goya's graphic art also combining Animal-Bird imagery, both real and fantastic, but with secular motifs dominant. The imagery of Goya is also disguised in order that its personal, political, religious,or satirical inspiration could not be identified. RAYMOND LePAGE, George Mason University, "Marc CHAIR: Donald E. Morse, Oakland University. MICHAEL R. "Jesperson Lewis." COLLINGS, Pepperdine University, on Toast: Language Acquisition in C.S. In spite of Lewis's acumen with languages, his treatment of language acquisition in Out of the Silent Planet comes closer to science-fictional treatments than to assessment of the difficulties first-contact attempts at communications. His purposes in stereotypic a realistic implicit in establishing constructing the novel far transcend his interest in scientific verisimilitude; and as a result, his handling of language becomes a tool by which he can illustrate and define his conception of a unified Christian universe. PETER W. MACKY, Westminster College, "Myth As the Way We Can Taste Reality: An Analysis of C.S. Lewis's Theory." C.S. Lewis was a master myth-maker, continuing popularity of his numerous clearly demonstrates. Lying behind his create fantastic worlds was a developed the contribution that fantasy and myth our lives. He suggested that by means can come to "taste" reality itself, knowing about it as observers at a dist essay suggests what he meant by this what value his theory may have. as the fantasies ability to- theory of can make to of myth we rather than ance. This remark and JEANNETTE HUME LUTTON, Morehouse College, "A Passion of Patience: Ransom in the Waste Land." How much does C.S. Lewis resemble T.S. Eliot in his adaptation of the Medieval romance to modern use? By surveying the comparative settings, characters, and stories we find there are enough parallels to conclude that The Waste Land is a pervasive allusion in That Hideous Strength in nearly the same way that Paradise Lost is in Perelandra. Yet there are major differences: e.g., the moral climate which in the fantasy leads 12