Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 9
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 9. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1181.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 9. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1181

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 9, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1181.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 9
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_010.jpg
Transcript One school of critical thought credits the "reality" of Goodman Brown's fantastic experiences, the other ascribes these experiences to hallucination or hysteria, leaving the reader with the logical problem of synthesizing a normative reading. Literarily, however, one is obliged to accept both views simultaneously. This is not only sanctioned in much fantastic literature but even assumed. The fantastic quality of literature inheres not only in irreality but in how such texts are naturalized. CHESTER WOLFORD, The Behrend College, Pennsylvcania State University. "Intimations of the Epic in The Scarlet Letter." Hawthorne's use of the epic tradition remains unexamined, although The Scarlet Letter draws heavily upon it. Like the Iliad and the Odyssey, the novel is divided into 24 parts. As in many epics, the action is of two kinds: Dimmesdale's battle, like Aeneas's, is fought internally in the first half, externally in the second. Epic transcendence occurs for Dimmesdale through Pearl, who escapes the past into the ethereal world of nobility, and the defeat that normally accompanies transcendence occurs in Dimmesdale's death, A similar argument could be made for Hester. ARTHUR COLEMAN, C. W. Post College, Long Island University. "Hawthorne's Pragmatic Fantasies." Hawthorne, in the majority of his tales, exemplifies perfectly a writer who uses the resources of controlled science fiction and fantasy — gothic ambiance, spells, omens, charms, ghosts, devils, witches, potions, alchemists, conjurors, fortune-tellers, pseudo-scientists, metaphysical artists, mesmerists, and a revolving stage of extramundane events and effects — to dramatize and reveal psychological insights about the human condition. Session IV, Thursday, lla.m.-12:30p.m. Film: BRIAN'S SONG Coral Ballroom 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. 1971, United States. Directed by Buzz Kulick. With James Caan, Billy Dee Williams, Shelley Fabares. An Emmy Award-winning movie made for television, BRIAN'S SONG is the true story of two teammates of the Chicago Bears football team, Gale Sayers and Brian Piccolo. Film: THE GREAT ECSTASY OF THE WOODSCULPTOR STEINER 12:25-1:10 p.m. 1975, West Germany. Directed by Werner Herzog. Herzog's lyrical documentary is about Walter Steiner, a Swiss woodcarver who is also the world's greatest ski jumper. Steiner usually flies beyond the landing areas of courses designed for ordinary men, smashing all existing records and confronting death every time he jumps. Amazing slow-motion photography captures the splendid, terrifying isolation of Walter Steiner's ecstasy. AUTHORS' READINGS Sandpiper Room 11 a.m. MARK DINTENFASS, reading an excerpt from Old World, New World. Mark Dintenfass's fifth novel, Old World,! New World, was published by William Morrow last month to wide acclaim. His first was written at the University of Iowa's Writer's Workshop in 1968. He teaches writing at Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin, is a veteran of the Peace Corps, and once taught at Haile Selassie University in Addis Ababa. 12 noon THOMAS ATKINS, reading an excerpt from Manifestation, a horror novel in progress. THE Thomas Atkins teaches at Hollins College, Virginia, and is the author of two novels, numerous plays and short stories, and five critical books on film. He is also editor of The Film Journal, and co-author of The Fire Came, which has been widely translated, condensed, and turned into a television program. 1 p.m. HARLAN ELLISON, speaking to an "open session" of the Writer's Workshop. Harlan Ellison is the author of over a thousand published short stories, movie scripts, and T.V. plays, and widely acclaimed as prose stylist, philosophical gadfly, and social critic among contemporary authors. His love-hate relationship with contemporary media is legendary. His stories are widely anthologized, in collections ranging from classroom "lit" books to bedtime readers. 10 JUNGIAN ARCHETYPES IN LITERATURE Seagrape Room CHAIR: Renate Delphendahl, University of Maine, Orono; Grant Crichfield, University of Vermont. FREDERICK J. BEHARRIEL, State University of New York, Albany. "Archetypes in Golding's Lord of the Flies." To emphasize the infinite riches of the collective unconscious, Jung once said that a little child could"reproduce all the myths and archetypes and religions the human race ever dreamed, imagined or invented. This idea may have been the inspiration for Lord of the Flies. When a group of boys are stranded on an island without adults they revert to a primitive social stage, the infancy of mankind. While the main characters are perhaps as properly seen as reflecting Freud's id, ego, and superego, the whole development of the child society, its symbols, its rituals, its types, its phobias, and its religion represent the emergence of Jungian archetypes from the collective unconscious. 10