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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 8. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1180.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 8. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1180

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 8, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1180.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_009.jpg
Transcript vulnerability of English women. RONALD CURRAN, University of Pittsburg. "Running Amok: Fantasy and Social Reality in Hunter Thompson's Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas." Some modern anthropological approaches to running amok argue its function as a complex form of social criticism. Thompson's requiem for the 1960s is a drug fantasy, a piece of new journalism which describes the extravagantly destructive running amok of Raol Duke, Thompson's persona. The zany episodes appear to be a blackly humorous grandstand play for the attention of the socially alienated drug culture. But in the light of such contemporary anthropological studies Duke's bizarre behavior may appear as an intentional attack on a series of key American social rituals and the values which underlie them. DANTE'S INFERNO AS FANTASY LITERATURE Room 110 CHAIR: Constance Markey, Loyola University, Chicago. MADISON U. SOLWELL, Brigham Young University. "Shades of Dante: A Twentieth-Century Odyssey Through Hell." For centuries for poets, recent work the notice Niven's and Dante's Comedy has been a sourcebook musicians and artists. However, a modelled on Dante's Hell has escaped of Dantists and Italianists: Larry Jerry Poumelle's Inferno (1976). Images and scenes in this modern science fiction odyssey remind us of Dante's, though the tone clearly places this inferno in 20th century America. CHARLES FRANCO, State University of New York, Stony Brook. "Gerione: The Medieval Flying Machine." Dante's descent from the seventh to the eighth circle of Inferno, through Gerione, is one of the most dramatic passages of the Divine Comedy. Gerione has been employed as an aerial vessel, the antecedent to a future space flight but in the context of the medieval mind seen as a flying ship. The result is a fantastic voyage through the empty darkness of Hell in which the interest of Dante the pilgrim overshadows the fear felt when he first encountered the awesome monster. CONSTANCE MARKEY, Loyola University. "Dante and the Cowboy Cantos: Crossing Flegetonte." In the twelfth canto of the Inferno Dante lets down his hair to indulge himself and the reader in a bit of low comedy and old fashioned suspense. In his unique use of mythological figures such as minotaurs and centaurs we recognize more than the usual medieval taste for storytelling, but rather the basis for many modern fantasy adventures. 8 FANTASY AND EXISTENTIALISM Suite 112 CHAIR: Donald Palumbo, Northern Michigan University. C. W. SULLIVAN, III., East Carolina University. "H. P. Lovecraft and Existentialism." Lovecraft's writings have been examined in a variety of ways, from autobiographical to Freudian, but few attempt to place Lovecraft's work in its early 20th century cultural context and assess its relationship to other horror fiction of the day. In context Lovecraft's work reflects the popular existentialism of his contemporaries, particularly concerning the topics of order and identity, which are given a uniquely Lovecraftian interpretation in such stories as "The Call of Cthulhu," "Pickman's Model," and the Randolph Carter dream sequence. HEIDI FALETTI, The Behrend College, Pennsylvania State University. "Objective Fantasy as Existential Reality in Kafka's The Metamorphosis." Gregor Samsa's tran semantic objectificat concretization of h traveling salesman e characteristics of past activities a detachment and mechan is well suited self-contemplation gradual dehydration prepares for final sterile existence and of his family. sformation into a beetle is a ion of existential guilt; a is traits as a dehumanized xploited by his family. The the beetle correspond to his nd mental states: habitual ical routine. The fantastic to function as a mode of and self-overcoming. The and starvation of the beetle transcendance of both his own the renewed animal vitality JEAN-PIERRE LALANDE, Moravian College, Pennsylvania. "Sartre's Existentialist Approach to the Fantastic in The Flies and No Exit." By choosing the mythological world of ancient Greece as the setting for The Flies, Sartre feels free to use devices traditionally associated with the fantastic. Some see this as an attempt to avoid a direct confrontation , with Nazi censorship during the occupation. Two years later, however, with No Exit, Sartre sets the action in another fantasy world, hell, which complements the world of the earlier fantasy, and is meant to present a new image of man's relationship to his environment, and of his destiny. ANNE D. C0RDER0, George Mason University, Virginia. "Vian's L'Ecume des jours: Social Satire Clothed in Fantasy." Boris Vian's L'Ecume des jours presents a special world of charming fantasy interwoven with profound sadness. Two themes run parallel: satire of social attitudes and institutions and an authentic, touching love story. Vian creates a world where the impact of social problems is more intense because of the poetic use of the fantastic, and yet, inversely, the fantasy saves the harsh social satire from becoming portentous or polemic. Together the themes convey a sense of horror and tragedy. THE USES OF THE FANTASTIC HAWTHORNE Suite 116 IN NATHANIEL CHAIR: James M. Davis, The Pennsylvania State University. Behrend College, DAVID NEAL MILLER, Ohio State University, and Fantasy in 'Young Goodman Brown1." "Reality