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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 7
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 7. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1179.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 7. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1179

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 7, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1179.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_008.jpg
Transcript Thurs. 9-10:30 Cont. last year's symphonic suite, St Anthology of Worlds, and winner Campbell Award as "Best New Writer the gently satirical "Mall Wor Asimov's, which has recently been re form by Donning/Starblaze. His Starship: Haiku, drew wide attention reviews. He will read a story nom Hugo Award after its appearance Sucharitkul was educated at Eton and holds MA's in both music and litera also present an illustrated talk on Contemporary Music" Friday evening. arscapes: An of the 1981 ," largely for Id" series in issued in book first novel and favorable inated for the in Analog. Cambridge and ture. He will "Fantasy in 10 a.m. GENE WOLFE, reading "Melito's Story — The Cock, The Angel, and The Eagle," from The Citadel of The Autarch. Gene Wolfe, a member of faculty, is winner of Award, as well as severa for such classic storie Island," The Fifth Head o as a superb prose stylist the best seller lists with tetralogy. His reading volume in this series. our Writers' Workshop the 1981 World Fantasy 1 Nebula and Hugo Awards s as "The Death of Doctor f Cerberus. Long regarded , Wolfe has recently hit his Book of the New Sun is drawn from the fourth CHAIR: Hugh Georgia. MAGIC IN LITERATURE Seagrape Room Pendexter III, Armstrong State College, A second phase of the magic portrait tradition in the Gothic novel began toward the middle of the 19th Century. Beginning with Hawthorne and culminating with Wilde's Picture of Dorian Gray, the portrait became the center of the story, rather than merely a device to generate chilling effects. The picture's magic now consisted in an ability to foretell the future and disclose the hidden depths of human personality. When Dorian Gray stabs his own portrait, only to be transformed himself into the "withered, wrinkled, and loathsome thing" the picture had been, the tradition achieved its most memorable expression. FANTASY AND SOCIAL REALITY Allamanda Room CHAIR: Jules Zanger, Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville. PAUL L. GASTON, Southern Illinois Edwardsville. "Spenser's Order, Ireland: Competing Fantasies." University, Spenser's Although the Faerie Queene as a whole shows how fantasy can facilitate responsible consideration of social issues, Book V of Spenser's epic shows instead how fantasy can be exploited for propagandistic purposes. In the context of a traditional rescue quest, Spenser uses conventions of fantasy to conceal the logical problems in his views on Ireland, to distort ideas which he opposes, and to dehumanize those on the wrong side of his argument. Book V reminds us how insidiously fantasy can work upon the unwary when the motives which sustain it are dark. ANCA VLAS0P0L0S, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan. "Frankenstein's Hidden Skeleton: The Psycho-Politics of Oppression." WILLIAM M. SCHUYLER, JR., University of Louisville, Kentucky. "The Ethical Status of Magic." Magic is making use of the supernatural. What counts as supernatural depends on what counts as natural, a disagreement, what humans supernatural. humans have with a authors subject on which there is broad There is also disagreement about have to do to make use of the The standard Christian view is that magical powers only by arrangement supernatural being, have suggested but contemporary numerous other possibilities. All of these present ethical problems, but the problems and solutions vary dramatically from one system to another. C. CLARKSON WHITE, Armstrong State College, Georgia. "...Voodoo. Black Magic..." In the tradition of writing which recognizes the evil inherent in the rise of Nazi Germany is Taylor Caldwell's novel Time No Longer, published in 1941 but set in Nazi Germany of 1933. To enhance the mood of evil throughout the story, advance the plot, and embellish the theme, Caldwell uses figures from and practices of voodoo which have been brought to Germany from Africa by the adopted Jewish brother of Aryan twin brothers. KERRY POWELL, Miami University, Ohio. Portrait in Fiction: Phase Two." "The Magic Continued interest in Frankenstein suggests that the novel contains a covert structure which gives it enduring coherence. The hidden logic of the novel consists of political choices which lead to the most divisive psychic struggles for the hero. Class selection appears in incident after incident, and the principal dynamics of Victor Frankenstein's actions is incest-avoidance, a problem of the aristocracy. Victor's fear creates the monster and leads to the demise of his circle. The monster represents the dispossessed, and together with parallel characters who, though not monstrous, lead abysmal existences and are perceived as threats to established order, he inspires cruelty and abhorrence. The novel's subtext, psychic and political, reveals that monsters are made, not born. LYNN R. ATKINS, Rochester, Michigan. "Literary and Social Terrorism: The Relationship between Gothic Conventions and Feminist Issues." The closed, nightmare world of monsters, inherited evil, imprisoned victims, and "sympathetic" houses serves to reflect symbolically the social reality, especially of English women, in the 18th and 19th centuries. More specifically, Gothic heroines such as Emily St. Aubert in Ann Radcliffe's The Mysteries of Udolpho or Catherine Earnshaw in Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights show how fantastic predicaments serve as metaphors for the 8