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Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 5. March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1177.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982). Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 5. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1177

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 5, March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1216/show/1177.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 10, 1982 - March 13, 1982
Description Program book for the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Stoppard, Tom
  • Ellmann, Richard
  • Delany, Samuel R.
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Aldiss, Brian W.
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Gunn, James E.
  • Malzberg, Barry N.
  • DiFate, Vincent
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Digby, John
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 14
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5286
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f014_040_006.jpg
Transcript Wed. 4-5:30 p.m. Cont. CRITICAL APPROACHES TO SCIENCE FICTION SECTION I Seagrape Room CHAIR: Robert Crossley, University of Massachusetts, Boston. ROBERT BEGIEBING, New Hampshire College. "The Mythic Hero in H. G. Wells's The Time Machine." Though a number of critics have Wells's mythic vision and the symbolic processes of his narrative mythic pattern of Wells's first nov be examined. Wells's "Time Travell the mythic quest of the hero as defin Campbell, Neumann, and Eliade. By journey into a mysterious and dimension, the novel's hero gains a could, but probably will not, be the his species. acknowledged archetypally , the central el has yet to retraces er it ed by Jung, his violent misunderstood wisdom that salvation of JOE SANDERS, Lakeland Community College, Ohio. "Jack London's and E. E. Smith's Refugee Superman." Jack London and E. E. Smith grapple with similar basic concerns in their fascination with the explosive appearance of the dramatically superior individual—the superman. Each realizes, however, that the superman's superiority drives him out of the relative safety of his crowd. For London, the superman is doomed to fail, either too slowly aware of the problems he faces or overcome by their sheer mass. In his Lensman series, though, Smith sets about deliberately re-shaping present conditions to create a world capable of accommodating the superman. MANUEL VAN LOGGEM, Amsterdam, Holland. "New Worlds of the Lowlands." Contemporary science fiction and fantasy writers in the Low Countries, their themes, and their particular approach to the genres are surveyed in this excerpt from New Worlds of the Lowlands: An anthology of Dutch and Flemish Fantasy and Science Fiction, edited by van Loggem, and forthcoming in May from Cross-Cultural Communications. CONTEMPORARY CRITICAL APPROACHES TO THE FANTASTIC Allamanda Room CHAIR: Jan Hokenson, Florida Atlantic university. GILA RAMRAS-RAUCH, Ohio State University. Poetics of the Fantastic." "Towards a With reference to Frank's concept of spatial form and Rabkin's reinterpretation, the movement from earlier fiction to modern and post-modern is seen to move from realistic to fantastic. The holistic, centripetal, and temporal properties of the realistic transmute to the atomistic, centrifugal, and predominately spatial properties of the fantastic. A composite modern and post-modern protagonist, drawn from Beckett, Kafka, Pynchon and others, demonstrated how fully in the 20th century the fantastic has been accepted into the literary mainstream, thus requiring critical redefinition of the novel and perhaps reappraisal of earlier distinctions of genre and period. NANCY C. MELLERSKI, Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania. "The Exploding Matrix: A Study of the Episode of the Bleeding Nun in Lewis' The Monk." The critical works of Bessiere, Brooks, and Ricardou illuminate the structural functions of the episode of the bleeding nun in M. G. Lewis' The Monk. Beginning on the premise that the fantastic contains two distinct discourses (empirical/meta-empirical) that are equally inadequate to account for a supernatural event, Beatrice's apparitions are shown to demonstrate that repetition and multiplication can lead to no ultimate resolution: causal unity (the metonymic) is replaced by formal unity (the metaphoric), and metaphoric perturbations in the episode of the bleeding nun permanently alter the narrative structure of The Monk. INGEBORG KOHN, University of Arizona, Tucson. "Reversal of Tradition, Oblivion of Memory: The Fantastic Vision of Monique Wittig's Utopia in Les Guerilleres." Monique Witt a feminist especially understood as "tradition." Kristeva, to old texts, and structure another writi ig's novel Les Guerilleres represents approach to the fantastic and to contemporary critical discourse the male-dominated approach known as To Wittig, and critics Cixous and write is essentially to rewrite the thereby appropriating the old language s for new, feminist invention "in ng." THE FANTASTIC IN ROMAN LITERATURE ROOM 110 CHAIR: Leonard Wencis, Howard University, Washington, D.C. ROBERT BOUGHNER, St. John Fisher College, Rochester, N.Y. "The Fantastic Catullus." Catullus (fl. 55 B.C.) uses imagines, unreal combinations of atoms and forms according to Lucretius, to create another world, to transcend the topical, to treat his constant theme of broken love on a cosmic scale. Creatures, half woman, half fish, rise from the waves to see the first boat made from living pines; tapestries come alive like some Roman television and tell a tale; and men and gods live in bliss without want. These elements from Catullus' Poem 64 make a fantastic world in which, however, love is born and dies, as impermanent here as it was in the real Rome where Lesbia abandoned Catullus. ANNE P. PERKINS, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri. "The Fantastic in Propertius." Three late elegies of Propertius (Bk. IV, Nos. 7, 8, 11) deliberately exploit supernatural devices. In the first a decomposing spectre—the poet's recently buried mistress Cynthia—upbraids, comforts and ultimately promises Propertius eternal