Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Program Book
Page 16
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
World Fantasy Convention. Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Program Book - Page 16. October 30, 1981 - November 1, 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1158/show/1110.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention. (October 30, 1981 - November 1, 1981). Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Program Book - Page 16. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1158/show/1110

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention, Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Program Book - Page 16, October 30, 1981 - November 1, 1981, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1158/show/1110.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Program Book
Creator (LCNAF)
  • World Fantasy Convention
Date October 30, 1981 - November 1, 1981
Description Program book for the Seventh World Fantasy Convention.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • World Fantasy Convention
  • Beagle, Peter S.
  • Froud, Brian
  • Wagner, Karl E.
  • Garner, Alan
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Berkeley, California
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 41
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5313
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 16
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f041_151_017.jpg
Transcript Pardon my catarrh: funny words in fantasy finely-boned face and bespoke the creature, "Then will I dine tonight with Mucronulates! Embusk! Tryma!" Kind of makes your flesh crawl, right? It's amazing what just a few fantastic touches can do for mood. But, here, let's try a pact-with-the-Devil story: Alone now in the Wizard's sanctum, Tryma rummaged among the embusks till he found one of sufficient size. Then, carefully he filled it with sedge, ullage, and a pinch of vidual. Slowly he stirred it, four times dorking-wise, and paced out the forgotten words inscribed on the floor: Mucro- nulate, Powers, pratchant thy night. T + * rums: Last but not least, I'd like to show you what my fantasy vocabulary can do with heroic ballads. Now, anybody who's read a bit of fantasy lately knows that the ballad is in, and it ain't all Tolkien. The modern fantasy ballad is not iambic so much as club-footed, and the author's alterlogisms generally make it worse. But just see if this doesn't leave you senseless with wonder: Beneath the seas of dorking, Catarrh clouds shift—He wakes! Tryma, the Nameless One of ancient Ullage. Embusk, yet pratchant, the Thing hears; But cannot speak the gammadion words Of His freedom. Mucronulately, now, He waits, does Tryma. Children, shall we sing the viduals Gladly! Gladly! Yet huddle, Sedgeless huddle when Tryma returns? I must say, I'm looking forward to the day the Universal Language of Fantasy comes about. For one thing, it will do away with those pesky pronunciation guides, and I'll be able to find the story in fantasy books without feeling like I'm cramming for an exam first. There are other benefits, too. Standardized alterlogisms will promote accessibility without hampering creativity, and they'll bring back to fantasy narratives that soothing rhythm which is so fragile that sometimes the slightest hint of content can disrupt it. As the candle flames flickered and danced their shadows up the wall, Tryma observed the floor enclosed within the gammadion seem to gi\e way and lose its substance. There was a flash, the candles blew out, and all was plunged into darkness. Tryma seized his lantern and illuminated the gammadion to find huddled within its confines a rather feeble looking demon, holding its hand before its face in the sign of Catarrh. You see, properly used, the same alterlogisms can liven up any sort of fantasy: they can even out-Cthulhu H. P. himself: I froze in terror as my flashlight played upon the gammadion lines of the form before me. Even Weston's journal had not prepared me for the inconceiveable hideousness of the Thing, its mucronulate viduals pratchant in the yellow beam. As the pounding of my heart subsided, I could hear the awful dorking sounds which issued from the Thing's writhing tryma. My presence had disturbed it, I knew, and there would be scant hope for me if I became embusked in the pulsating ullage it emitted. The only chance I might have was the tiny sedge which I carried in my watchpocket, the token which poor Weston had placed so much faith in ... if I was to emerge from this cavern of terror, it would have to serve me better than it served him. Now. The viduals seemed to slither toward me, and the stench of catarrh filled the chamber. Now was not the time for scientific speculation. As my hands scrabbled for the sedge and final hope, the flashlight dropped from my nerveless fingers. BARRY R. LEVIN SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY LITERATURE 2253 Westwood Blvd. Los Angeles, Calif. 90064 (213) 474-5611 FIRST EDITIONS OF SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY 17th through 20th Century Bought and Sold AB AA 17