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Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Program Book
Page 13
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World Fantasy Convention. Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Program Book - Page 13. October 30, 1981 - November 1, 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1158/show/1107.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention. (October 30, 1981 - November 1, 1981). Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Program Book - Page 13. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1158/show/1107

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention, Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Program Book - Page 13, October 30, 1981 - November 1, 1981, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1158/show/1107.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Program Book
Creator (LCNAF)
  • World Fantasy Convention
Date October 30, 1981 - November 1, 1981
Description Program book for the Seventh World Fantasy Convention.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • World Fantasy Convention
  • Beagle, Peter S.
  • Froud, Brian
  • Wagner, Karl E.
  • Garner, Alan
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Berkeley, California
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 41
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5313
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 13
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f041_151_014.jpg
Transcript Pardon my catarrh: funny words in fantasy and Otherwhence but because it describes them so lyrically. In other words, it's not the fact that the words are funny, it's not even how the funny words sound by themselves; it's how they carry along the flow of the narrative. The ancient bards would never have gotten where they are today if they had sung lines like, "Dhialgc grunted and sat down on a rock"; or "Silently he stalked his prey, disturbing not even a turklebird.' To pepper one's prose with alterlogisms in place of lyricism is, at best, a cheap shot. Not knowing how the funny words are supposed to be pronounced is a big problem for the listening reader; I contend it is not alleviated one bit by little pronunciation guides at the beginning of books (you know, right after the maps and the restaurant ratings of Elfland). Oh sure, those guides tell you that the author did have something in mind and not just a problem with the typography, but that doesn't mean the words are going to fit into the prose any better. And one feels obliged to go back and check the damn guide with every new funny word that pops up, which not only interrupts the story but also keeps one wondering why the author chose to use "qez" for the sound of "k" as in "kilter." $0,207 Universal LayoBfz offantasy I realize that the intention behind funny words is the fantasy author's effort to take us away from all this. It's a motive I can respect; therefore I have reservations about exhorting them to eschew alterlogisms. Besides, it's rather a mouthful to go around chanting. Nonetheless, I am afraid something must be done to save true lyric fantasy from dissolution through the practice of frivolously adding funny words to it. Sol have a suggestion: let's come up with a Universal Language of Fantasy. It doesn't have to have a lot of awkward sounds; in fact, it could comprise a lexicon of perfectly nice but underexploited English words. And of course, since there are so many different 14 types of fantasy stories, it should be a flexible sort of vocabulary as to precise meanings. Here. I'll show you. Let's take ten meaty-sounding words from the Oxford English Dictionary, chosen strictly for their fantastic phonemes: catarrh, dorking, embusk, gammadion, mucro- nulate, pratchant, sedge, tryma, ullage, and vidual. Now let's introduce them into a typical sword-and-sorcery scene. Gammadion held his sedge high, his impatient blood running hot through his veins. At last! He felt that in the oncoming battle against the unspeakable Ullage he might at last become a man, at last revenge the slaughter of his family as they slept innocent in their tiny embusk. The ground shook with the pounding of tryma hooves, and now Gammadion heard the trumpet of the Ullage dorking, as they charged over the dawn-bright ridge with a fearsome war cry of "Catarrh!" The boy ran forward brandishing the sedge, but was almost instantly overcome with pain as his side was pierced by the vidual spear of the nearby Ullage warrior. Gammadion raised himself with all his strength, and slowly, agonizingly slowly, the sedge rose again over his head, and, seemingly even slower, it swung to strike the Ullagian in the temple. The barbarian screamed with rage and pain, and his body, naked save for the bronze loinguard, collapsed, the fiery pratchant tattooed on his chest heaving its death throes at Gam- madion's feet. But the boy could not savor his first kill, for now the blood coursed out from his own hot veins onto the ground, and before his fading vision the battlefield seemed to mucronulate. Then, the sweet visage of his murdered mother rising before his eyes, Gammadion fell senseless. Puts Edgar Rice Burroughs to shame, doesn't it? But there's no reason our alterlogisms should work only in sword-and-sorcery. Here's a standard Celtic mythological sort of tale: Vidual stood trembling in the pratchant blackness of the Celtic wood, her humble brown ullage pulled tight against the cold. Oh! how she wished to return to the warmth of her modest gammadion, but she was drawn too powerfully, not of her own will, to confront the sedge who had carried away her lover. She knew if she turned back she would never sleep o' nights again. Her gleaming auburn hair caught the powdery moonlight as she gathered all her strength into the folds of the ullage, threw back her head, and called softly the words taught her by the old catarrh: "Embusk . . . tryma! Show me your face, O Spirit-Stealer, O Dark-of-the-Forest!" With only a slight dorking of laurel leaves, the sedge stood before her, its great round eyes a blazing torch of faraway. "Vidual," rang out its deep yet fair voice, "who speaks those words is no longer of Man, but owes allegiance to the country beyond the black downs, and its Baron, Muc ronulates. Do you dare voice the forbidden syntax yet again once more?" Though the swaying wind stung her tearful and trembling eyes, Vidual paused not, but raised her continued page 17