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Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Program Book
Page 12
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World Fantasy Convention. Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Program Book - Page 12. October 30, 1981 - November 1, 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1158/show/1106.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention. (October 30, 1981 - November 1, 1981). Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Program Book - Page 12. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1158/show/1106

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention, Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Program Book - Page 12, October 30, 1981 - November 1, 1981, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1158/show/1106.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Program Book
Creator (LCNAF)
  • World Fantasy Convention
Date October 30, 1981 - November 1, 1981
Description Program book for the Seventh World Fantasy Convention.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • World Fantasy Convention
  • Beagle, Peter S.
  • Froud, Brian
  • Wagner, Karl E.
  • Garner, Alan
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Berkeley, California
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 41
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5313
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 12
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f041_151_013.jpg
Transcript It's not that I have anything against fantasy, it's just that I have this rule: never read a story with three or more funny words on the first page. This is, I swear, a general rule, and if I came across a detective story that took place in Dalhallan-on-the-Mists and the detective was named N'Garth of Putzlich, I would drop it in a minute. Really. And I wouldn't even pick up a women's consciousness novel if the protagonist was named Tangenna and was fighting her way up the corporate ladder of Srithalmar, Inc. Honest, I wouldn't. But this sort of thing is only a real problem in fantasy stories. It doesn't stop at funny names, either. At least N'Garth the detective probably wouldn't find, as a dying clue, a single sprig of snegwort at the scene of the crime. And Tangenna most likely didn't pull herself up by her rough sandal straps out of the secretarial tagtling pool. Yet such neologisms (or, with your indulgence, alterlogisms) occur with such frequency in fantasy that I find I am reluctant to continue reading, even if there are none on the first page, since they have a nasty way of insinuating themselves later on, especially in novels and most especially in trilogies. This has led me to my law on the Unavoidable Appearance of Funny Words in Fantasy: the further you go, the likelier they are to show up. Why should funny words be so much of a problem for me? Well, basically, it's because I can't pronounce them. This is not simply a matter of vanity, although the fact that I can pronounce words in Vietnamese, Hungarian, Sanskrit and Yoruba makes me somewhat impatient with funny words that are sort of based on Gaelic. I mean, if you're going to create Somewhere Else, why make it sound like the language next door? Considering the wide variation in forms of words to be found in Earthly languages, it's a shame a fantasy reader should get the idea that alternative universes, the world of Faerie and the land of the Elder Gods, although incomprehensibly different from our world in most things, derived their languages from Latin. But this peculiar imaginative gap in the literature of imagination is not really what bothers me as I plow my way through Throags riding their trugebeests or ancient Lithuanian gods named Czascklik possessing bus drivers. I am distressed by the way these funny-sounding words get plunked into the middle of otherwise undistinguished sentences, like snegworts popping up in the desert. See here, fantasy has been wonderful since time immemorial not because it describes the world of Elsewise continued next page 13