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Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Program Book
Page 7
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World Fantasy Convention. Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Program Book - Page 7. October 30, 1981 - November 1, 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1158/show/1101.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention. (October 30, 1981 - November 1, 1981). Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Program Book - Page 7. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1158/show/1101

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention, Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Program Book - Page 7, October 30, 1981 - November 1, 1981, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/1158/show/1101.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Seventh World Fantasy Convention, Program Book
Creator (LCNAF)
  • World Fantasy Convention
Date October 30, 1981 - November 1, 1981
Description Program book for the Seventh World Fantasy Convention.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • World Fantasy Convention
  • Beagle, Peter S.
  • Froud, Brian
  • Wagner, Karl E.
  • Garner, Alan
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Berkeley, California
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 41
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5313
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f041_151_008.jpg
Transcript bbi BBHRBBfln HHHH 8s BHBHHHH RESTAURANTS AND LIMBS AND OTHER DIGRESSIONS by Marta Randall When I was a child growing up in Berkeley, my best friend Minnie and I spent many of our summer afternoons trespassing on the grounds of the un-renovated, tattered, dark, old, terrifying, and irresistible Claremont Hotel. Transgressing on the gardens was tame, despite the constant danger of running into an outraged gardener brandishing a pruning shears; the real adventure lay in the hotel itself, complete with stalking and ferret-eyed security guards, unexpected encounters with the mostly-elderly residents of the place (which encounters often scared us more than the appearance of two raggedy eleven-year-old girls scared the codgers), desperate flights along dubious corridors, the terror of creaking stairways, the heart- stopping sound of a single deliberate footstep around the next corner—had The Shining been available in my youth I would have accepted it as simple fact, for the Claremont and the Overlook were sisters under the plaster. Two events decorate my memory of those trespasses, one repeated and one singular. The Claremont maintained a wonderful fire escape, an enclosed, spiral, wooden slide buried within the building like a secret. Minnie and I would creep stealthily up the many staircases of the hotel (the service stairs were the preferred mode for safety, but the public staircases offered far more in the nature of excitement), sneak along the quiet, fading corridors, and pop into the chute. There followed a rushing, pitch-black, quicksilver descent from the topmost floor to the bottom, frightening in its swiftness and frightening in that we never knew whether a ferret-faced gentleman awaited us at the bottom of the slide, anger in his eye and a lecture ready on his lips. Sometimes, of course, we were caught on the way up, but on the best days we weren't caught at all, for then we had the pleasure of the slide and the pleasure of the fear, too, without any payment due. A few years ago the Claremont closed the fire escape; before donating it to various local parks they allowed a bunch of kids to descend it one last time, although the children missed the fun of sneaking up on it. I wish they'd contacted me; I know, and knew then, that Minnie and I were not the first to discover 8 that slide, but we did feel as though we held a patent on the thing and I'd have appreciated the chance to take one last, hair-raising, water-smooth ride through the heart of the Claremont Hotel. The second event took place not on the hotel's topmost floors but in its sub-basements, a remembered maze of ill-lit, faintly echoing corridors, tinged with dying Victorian scents and inhabited by ghosts, warlocks, and rubber-soled agents of the hotel intent upon throwing us out. During one of our forays into these catacombs, Minnie and I discoverd a locked wooden door on which was painted the word limbs. Simply that, nothing more. We crouched by that door and speculated. The room was too far underground to house tree limbs, and we rather doubted that the Claremont staff, ancient though it appeared to us, was sufficiently Victorian to store furniture legs in a room labelled limbs. We never did arrange a satisfactory explanation of that door. Years later I ventured a nostalgic trespass on those sub-basements but could not locate the door again; its mystery remains unbroken to this day. I keep speculating, though, and my speculations get darker and more bloody as time goes by. Since that distant summer afternoon, I have never comfortably eaten at the Claremont Hotel. I shall, in all likelihood, not comfortably eat at the Claremont during the World Fantasy Convention, either. I may not even try. There are any number of good restaurants within walking or busing distance of the Claremont; since I am nothing if not a chivalrous sort, I will tell you about them. The following guide is my own, and will probably find detractors among the peasantry, but ignore these people. I am a Native, and I have your best intentions at heart. Of course, you'll probably want to attend the banquet at the Claremont, and far be it from me to decry this desire. I will, though, offer one piece of advice. Avoid the leg of lamb. Limbs, indeed. w 0 H < $ w Q Z