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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 052. 1956-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/961.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-03). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 052. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/961

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 052, 1956-03, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/961.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date March 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 052
Transcript Book Reviews \EIM Consult your bookstore for books reviewed here — or write to publishers listed. The Final Secret of Pearl Harbor By Rear Adm. Robert A. Theobald, The Devin- Adoir Company, 23 East 26th St., New York 10, N. Y., 1954, xix, 202 pp., $3.50. Admiral Kimmel's Story By Rear Adm. Husband E. Kimmel, Henry Reg- nery Co., 20 West Jackson Blvd., Chicago 4, III., 1955, xvi, 206 pp., $3.75. In many ways the Pearl Harbor story is similar to the famous Dreyfus case which so stirred French interest and emotions late in the last century. In America's case, two military commanders were made the scapegoats for the mistakes and derelictions of others. Admiral Husband E. Kimmel and General Walter C. Short were the American Navy and Army commanders, respectively, at Pearl Harbor at the time the Japanese launched their surprise attack. The attack was a surprise to the Pearl Harbor commanders, but it would not have been had they been given the information available in Washington. Admiral Kimmel's predecessor in command of the Pacific Fleet had disagreed with President Roosevelt's determination to base the fleet at Pearl Harbor where adequate defensive arrangements would be difficult. Admiral Richardson had strongly advocated basing the fleet on the California coast. So he had been relieved of his command of the fleet. Admiral Kimmel had to make the best of the situation as he found it. His orders were to prepare and train the fleet for war. That he carried out this assignment with skill and efficiency is witnessed by the magnificent account the Navy gave of itself in the Pacific war, despite the staggering losses suffered in the Pearl Harbor attack. The defense of the naval forces w bile they were at their base at Pearl Harbor was primarily the responsibility of the Army under General Short. This task General Short was apparently supposed to accomplish with the planes an>l equipment being sent to the British and Russians. Admiral Kimmel reveals that of 180 bombers and patrol planes promised to the Hawaiian Coastal Frontier, only twelve were supplied. At the time of attack, six of these were in operating condition, ft might be added that General Short had other difficulties Page 50 with which to contend — Including a prohibition upon normal precautionary measures, such as dispersal of planes in individual revetments. It was physically impossible for the Pearl Harbor commanders to maintain an effective system of patrols with the means they had. If the time of an expected attack could be pinpointed to a certain day, all-out employment of all facilities could repel the attack. As we now know, just such precise information was known in Washington. The Japanese code had been broken and Washington was reading all messages. Washington knew that the Japanese were assembling an extremely detailed bombing plan of the Pearl Harbor base — but the Pearl Harbor commanders were never informed of this. Washington knew the exact hour of the attack — and remained silent. Hardly before the bombs had stopped falling, the moves were under way to conceal the responsibility of President Roosevelt and his subordinates, and to pin the onus on the Pearl Harbor commanders. Many investigations were conducted during the next several years. The findings of the honest ones were stamped "secret" and buried in the files. The whitewash findings of the other ones were splashed in headlines and editorial columns over the land. General Short repeatedly pleaded to be tried by courts-martial. But it was safer to "try" these two capable and innocent officers in print. Admiral Theobald was at Pearl Harbor on the day of the attack. Over the succeeding years, he has aided Admiral Kimmel's defense and has spent innumerable hours in a search for the truth. His findings receive admirable presentation in his book, which was published in its entirety in U. S. News 6 World Report. Likewise, Admiral Kimmel has devoted fifteen years to clearing his name of the vicious and false charges made against him. It is tragic that General Short, who so wanted to clear his own name for his family's sake, did not live to see these two books published. For Admirals Kimmel and Theobald have also cleared General Short's name in the only positive way it could be done — by placing and proving the blame squarely where it belongs. The story as it unfolds is as amazing as it is revolting. And there are chapters yet to be told. While we know now that the United States was secretly committed to war by executive agreement, important documents rf lating to the deals between Roosevelt and Churchill are being secreted to this day. Particular reference is mad' to the so-called Kent documents — co'; respondence between Roosevelt ad Churchill that was transcribed by ' code clerk in the American embasS in London, Tyler Kent. There hsq been no anguished bleats in the "li» eral" press over the fact that th' British, under their official secrets 8fl imprisoned Tyler Kent for trying " leak out information from these doc" ments. Those who have been so d* turbed by the prospect of any actio' against Alger Hiss, Owen Lattimof* the Amerasia crowd and the like serf only too happy with any and all me& c't,(uis of ures taken to suppress the Pearl Hf P,Vernmen bor story. Indeed, few men receP "'"'iiatio, more favorable publicity than the w *nders, ures directly involved in the machW If tl,lls a Sage in , Again ; Mewed t Wanese ; he orders »at were fusions tl *en thouj fusions w he infer,, ta'ned me Rfsed sin * On Pea ... When t g^hjngto Ny dis, ** appall neeofne; n ^e Nav tions leading up to Pearl Harbor al? those engaged in the "historical bl'lC out" ever since. iT,r The record of the day-by-day n . hour-by-hour developments which c' V nn'natcd in the totally unnecessary' of more than 3,000 lives in the ??* Harbor attack is a fascinating chafl in the history of our global i'1' ,,"'>' shouii T,r naval Real political issues cannot be manufactured by the leaders of [Hiriics. and cannot /»*■> evaded W them — tliey declare tin'mst'lremand come out of the depths of that deep which toe call puhUc opinion. — I. \ i; i n i n if X ventionism which supplanted the jl tested Monroe Doctrine. No bett^ more careful account is to be than that embodied in these boojj two senior naval officers. Both bj are highly readable, despite the 0j sity of dealing with many coflJ technical matters. Both authors X* „, .;v|'ich i\ "''t at succeeded in making a clear and L' St""Sl'\elt | cise presentation of vast ainoiin15. a *'ijs on j- documentary material. The factfj \.""> are conclusions are incontestable, <j1 L/"1*- than by the bland and superficial nial that shuns all requirement- n<1 the \, MaVefo 6f*' A* l,ePt a fr* lKlS(' *V*holh tk (l,at I C Tltlv'' Cul and , 'JJJ4 the K"'s- b Cln Hi CS?1* at, ;""",, 'hi mde logic and proof. no thi* Lest we"be led to think that "'"J t\Ql Harb, nothing more than an exercise & 4 d^'0rr"atic ing over the coals of the p«s^J «.at of tl, would do well to consider the * j \^s each of Admiral Kimmel. After all, *'eJ tif ' "h'ik! ,- still pursuing the same globalisticfj ^ * raiS(.(] eies which procured the Pearl H^j L tl('n to 1 attack. If we are going to COl>n t^'U'iie,! the same course, we can at le"s| to avoid falling again into some e worst pitfalls. And our experie«>J Korea adds a sharp exclamation' to Admiral Kimmel's remarks. tl7 their p K .> fn Facts Foiuim News, March: I 4*>lurj01 V Bknce v,.|t. the w co„rsi *t> IF, 'Ori
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