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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
File 042
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 042. 1956-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/951.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-03). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 042. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/951

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 042, 1956-03, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/951.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date March 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 042
Transcript halfway stopping point on the road to collectivism. Well, to start with specific cases — let's take the subject of collective bargaining. It is certainly quite proper for the ILO to endeavor to protect the right of collective bargaining, but let me tell you how far the ILO is going in that direction. The ILO has proposed that if most of the workers in an industry have signed a collective bargaining agreement, government should have the power to compel the rest of the workers in that industry to sign up likewise, regardless of whether or not they wished to do so. What they want is nation-wide collective bargaining enforced by government decree. But the Socialists go further than that. Some of them in the ILO suggested that one-half of the Board of Directors of a company should be chosen by management, and the either half should be chosen by the Union, which would have an equal right with the management as to the course of action of the company. In case of a deadlock, the matter would be submitted to government. This would put government in the position of being the controlling factor in the future destiny of industrial enterprises. Do you think this is far-fetched? It is nothing of the sort. This device is known as co-determination, and it is the laic in Germany today. THE BIRTH OF SOCIAL SECURITY Well — let's go on to another subject. Let's take Social Security. It may interest you to know that the ILO brags that one of its earliest and most successful technical assistance projects was when it sent two experts over to the United States to show us how to set up our Social Security System! For Social Security was born and bred in the ILO. And Social Security, according to the the ILO, is still in its infancy. In 1952 the ILO enacted a convention entitled "Minimum Standards of Social Security." I want to emphasize that word minimum, because it is the intent of the ILO at some time in the future to develop, God help us, what thev are going to call Advanced Standards of Social Security. Under the title "Minimum Stand- arels of Social Security," the ILO drafted an international law providing government benefits for practically "all the ills the flesh is heir to." It is a blueprint for the biggest give-away program yet devised. Under this proposal government would pay people money for the following: Any condition requiring medical care of a preventive or corrective nature, in- Page 40 eluding pregnancy, and ami morbid rendition, whatever its cause. Loss of earnings due to sickness or unemployment. Survival beyond a prescribed age. Employment injuries. Babies. The government pays you for having them; the more you have die more money you get. Childbirth, including medical care ' and hospitalization. Invalidity — which is defined as "inability to engage in any gainful activity." Death benefits — that is, life insurance. Originally included in this proposal was a provision to the effect that all life insurance must be compulsory and subsidized by government, and any insurance would be illegal unless government paid at least 25 per cent of the cost of the premiums. This effort at socializing insurance was aimed at putting out of business insurance companies such as we have in the United States. This convention also contained provisions for socialized medicine, such as they have in England. Well, now, we are getting echoes in the United States. Our House of Representatives has passed a bill (H. B. 7225) which provides that if at any time after the age of 50 a man becomes totally disabled and is so certified by the government, he can immediately collect the same amount of Social Security benefits that he otherwise would get alter retirement at age 65. That bill will he up for consideration by the Senate at the next session of the Congress. Think what that means. To be eligible for total disability, a man must be certified by government doctors. This means doctors on the government payroll. This puts doctors in government, and is the opening step toward socialized medicine. WHEN WILL IT END? Now let's take it from the standpoint of insurance. Private insurance companies now protect people against total disability. But now government comes along and enters that field. So you have, therefore, in this bill, the opening wedge toward socialized medicine and socialized insurance; and these provisions are lifted out of the ILO Convention on Minimum Standard of Social Security. For example, the ILO convention proposes government payments for 'invalidity," which it defines as the "inability to engage in anv gainful activity." Our bill, fl.B 7225, defines "disability" as the "inability to engage- in any substantial gainful activity" — a change of only one word. Our bill states that a person may be ruled dis abled as the result of "any medically determinable physical or mental impairment." The ILO uses the phrase "any morbid condition, whatever its cause." We will be hearing more, in this country, about a morbid condition and invalidity. NURSING A DECISION In 1952 the ILO passed a convention called the Maternity Protection Convention, which provides that: An employed woman should be given at least 12 weeks off to have her baby, with free medical care and hospitalization. During this period she would receive from the government, in cash, an amount equal to two-thirds of her pay. A woman cannot be discharged while on maternity leave. Inte-rruptions for nursing the baby, and I quote: "In eases where the matter is governed by or in accordance with laws and regulations," are to he counted as working hours and paid for by the company] 1 sat in the Committee on Maternity Protection, and at times I couldn't be lieve my ears. In that Committee resentatives from countries all the world spent an entire half-day 01 bating as to whether or not an in'1'' national law should contain a pro^J ,,el sion to the effect that a mother shen'1 «Ur furin nurse her babv for one hour, dud1'- |~ tli,,v ., I . r . i .• 1 „ill j; • ltl governm What ar "le State In 195 What the for vv orke tile con governm. tions for feeding balanced inS costs 8°vernm< •Upervise '"" in i,„ F< At its 1 "J'tecl a r j"1 Train! wtve I s ?gn to tl st,it,-v ,,If assut ,'" agri< Ployee. It Nt,„-„ „ ' collect P««ed the **?tern Foi U'<'1L u the working clay, or for two hall h°j nursing periods. As I recall it. I held out for two hall-hours, and lsi'JI held out for one full hour. No conclusion was reached, for "j reason, I imagine, that the m the Committee knew little about '" subject, and the women on the C"^j mittee seemed singularly unequipl for the purpose under discussion. In that Committee I got a clear-1^ idea as to the relative positions.' maternity and paternity in the istic Utopia. Apparently, in those golden crJ^ practically all women are supposed work. Their babies are financedJ\ government benefits; and in ", course they bring them to work ^ them, placing them in government'^ nurseries and leaving their machtfj or typewriters, to nurse them on c<> panv time. There is no distinction tvvcen legitimacy and illegitimacy The place of the father in Z scheme of things, married or uni^ ried, is reduced purely to the f|mt , of paternity. The state takes over, ^ large extent, the functions of the & ilv. It provides against a multitu contingencies for which, in a I society, the husband and fathe' supposed to provide. « •"nilv ri ::, ""-<>' £applic; ii, ■tli,s < 3rvover Cis,I,r,i I "tll"'-< Ci""" v, 5amjj :ri("v !"" by I „ u°n't fl l^dcit II '''V| giv Hi','-P. Under such circumstances, whu'v comes of the family? What hec«K J What Is the object oj| of the homi institution of marriage? What ™ pens to the children, starting 1" Facts Forum News, March, >' '•eh 3 -O ha % ^ese, r;'ncc»i Vts For,,
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