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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
File 041
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 041. 1956-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/950.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-03). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 041. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/950

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 041, 1956-03, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/950.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date March 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 041
Transcript ,,ni A t4 delegates are accompanied by advisors. Total attendance is usually over 600, with over 60 nations represented. At the Annual Conference, the ILO enacts proposals which are in effect skeleton drafts of legislation which it hopes will be enacted by member countries. These may be passed in the form of a re-solution, a leeoiiimeiida- tion or a convention. A convention — a>icl [lay close attention to this — is a draft of a proposed international law "inch, when ratified by member nations, stands as a treat} among them. By this means the ILO seeks to introduce standardized basic laws into countries all over the world. VVhen the United States joined the »LO in 1934, it was with the reservation that our country would not be '"mid by such convention procedure, DUt would consider anv 11.() proposals as recommendations only. In 1911, however, when our Congress, by joint [^solution, approved the Philadelphia Y'claration, we entered the ILO on ™e same basis as other member nations— so that today, if we ratify an '•<) convention, it stands as an international treaty and we- are bound by " accordingly. 'he ii.o has a Governing Body, '"'"posed of representatives of gov- ''""ueiits, workers and employers, J'lieh serves, vein might say. as its r°ard of Directors. I was elected one 'J, the ten emplover members of the **oyerning body. ' , 't has a permanent office in Geneva "'•'<l'-el bv a Director-General, and a itult of about S00 pe-rsons. This is Qa?Wn as tne International Labor , "JCe. It sends missions of technical ' S|stanee to countries all over the '"'d, supposedly to help increase productivity, but f suspect largely to propagandize on behalf of socialism. It conducts research and makes investigations, the purposes and results of which are not too clear, and releases publications, the purpose of which is only too clear — namely, that of propagandizing all over the world on behalf of the fLO and the socialistic measures which it champions and promotes. There' is something unique about the Geneva ILO staff and personnel — they are all tax-exempt. Although they constantly recommend measures that will add to the taxes of everybody else, they themselves pay no income taxes to any country. A MEANS OF PROMOTING SOCIALIST IDEOLOGY In its earlier years the ILO devoted itself to matters directly concerned with labor. It enacted conventions, for example, on living quarters of seamen in the international marine service, the employment of women in underground mines, the employment of children in factories, safety provisions, and so forth, and proposed a series of constructive practices which everybody in our country would agree should apply to employment conditions the world over. But then the ideology of state socialism came into acendancy in Europe and spread to other parts of the world. The ILO fell complete!) under the domination of a Socialist government-labor coalition. It decided that anything in industry, government, or social systems that in any way affected the- working man was a subject for consideration by the ILO. This was how the state socialists moved in on the organization, and used it as a means of promoting socialist ideology. The employer delegates to the ILO have consistently and eloquently objected to the proposed drafts of international Socialist laws fostered by the II.O; but thev have' been hopelessly in the minority, and out-voted on practically all issues. Now — 1 have told you that the ILO is a breeding ground of socialist ideas. So now 1 think I had better get down to eases and give vim a few specific examples: First of all, suppose I review the basic principles of socialism as I understand them from my II.O experience. In the United States we believe, as was said in our Declaration of Independence, that men are born with certain inalienable rights, and that government derives its powers from the consent of the governed. The principle of socialism is exactly the opposite. The premise of socialism is that all rights belong to government — and government then parcels them out to the people in line with its own divine judgment. 1 have sometimes said that the main purpose of the ILO is that of trying to substitute government for God. The underlying theme of ILO proposals is always government regulation, government domination, government control, government direction, government supervision, and of course, in the long run, government ownership of industry, government price control, and government dictation as to jobs and wages. There is no WIDE U'Hlll U. S. Delegates (left to right! J. Ernest Wilkins, Asst. Secretory for Internotionol Labor Affairs; Warren E. Burger, Assr. Attorney General, Civil Div. Department of Justice; Employer Delegate William L. McGroth, President, Williamson Heater Company, during the 1954 Annual Conference of the ILO in Geneva. (Man ot extreme right unidentified in photo.I ls Fobum News, March, 1956 Page 39
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