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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 040. 1956-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/949.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-03). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 040. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/949

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 040, 1956-03, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/949.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date March 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 040
Transcript WILLIAM L. McGRATH expresses his views on the International Labor Organization. As U. S. Employer Delegate to the ILO Annual Conferences of 1954 and 1955, and having previously attended ILO Conferences as U. S. Employer Advisor from 1949 to 1952 consecuf ive/y, he knows the history, expansion and future trends of this organization. THE STRANGE CASE OF THE International Labor Organization Lef's Write Our Own Laws, in Our Own Way OUR Congress, during this session, will be asked to raise the ceiling for the United States' contribution to the International Labor Organization from $1,750,000 a year to $3,000,000 a year. This provision is contained in Senate Joint Res- olution No. 97. If this is agreed to by the Congress, it will be just another example of $3,000,000 of the taxpayers' money going for a purpose that few people know anything about and most Americans have never even heard of. The total budget of the ILO is arrived at by multiplying by four the contribution of the United States. We pay 25 per cent and the other 69 member countries pay the remaining 75 per cent. If we boost our contribution from $1,750,000 to $3,000,000, this boosts the total ILO budget from $7,000,000 to $12,000,000, and will enable it to expand its activities accordingly. How many of you are familiar with the ILO, and what it does? Most of you know, I presume, that it is affiliated with the United Nations. But are you aware that the International Labor Organization has been in existence for some 36 years, considers itself an international parliament, and is drafting basic laws on social and economic matters which are having profound influence upon legislation all over the world? Mr. McCrath delivered this speech before the annual meeting of The National Machine Tool Builders Association of New York. Page 38 As the years have gone by you have seen one Socialist proposal after another introduced into the House and the Senate of the United States. Haven't you ever wondered where these things come from? Well, I can give you the answer. Many of them have originated in the ILO, which has for years been the breeding ground of international socialistic legislation. ORIGIN OF THE ILO The ILO originated with the League of Nations, with the idea that an international organization devoted to consideration of the problems of labor the world over would be a useful adjunct to the League, and an instrument on behalf of world peace. The League of Nations died, but the ILO kept right on going; and the United States joined it in 1934. Then along came the United Nations, and the ILO hooked up with the United Nations in 1945. The ILO is, however, not under the direction of the United Nations. The United Nations gives the ILO an additional $2,000,000 a year, of which we pay 33/3 per cent, for what it calls its technical assistance program, but the ILO runs its own show and gets its own budget appropriations directly from member governments. The ILO, as originally conceived, was supposed to concern itself purely with questions dealing with labor — but at a meeting in Philadelphia in 19 14 they adopted a declaration which said, among other things, that "Poverty everywhere constitutes* danger to prosperity everywhere," tha people have a "right" to econon" security, and which stated, "It is tl* responsibility of the Internatioi1'', Labor Organization to examine n" consider all international, econOl"\ and financial policies in the light " this fundamental objective." , By this device the ILO arrogat^ unto itself the supposed right to cli* basic laws, on social and econo"1' questions, for adoption by mem''8 countries all over the world. In 1954 Russia, which had 1<" been absent from the f LO, came 1"'' into it in a big way, bringing sateU" countries also into the picture. >\?i Communists gained a strong footh". in 1954 and strengthened their V° tion in 1955. That in the main brings you up'*"! elate on the origin and developme of the ILO. UN NOT THE BOSS OF ILO Now let's consider the function1 of the ILO. As I said before, althotfjj it is a United Nations affiliate, it lSJ bossed by the United Nations, f.. furthermore it is unique among i" j national agencies because it is £ composed solely of representatives government. At its Annual Conference held eiJ June in Geneva, Switzerland, e.^ participating nation has four v" ,r delegates; two representing fioVeers ment, one representing empl°3 and one representing workers. Facts Fobum News, March- ''
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