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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 038. 1956-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 17, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/947.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-03). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 038. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/947

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 038, 1956-03, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 17, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/947.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date March 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 038
Transcript CONDENSATION OF my basic study and knowledge of Japanese problems that counted most. . ." Our foreign service could take a leaf from Sorge's book. While the State Department personnel is normally of a high social and educational caliber, they are not necessarily expert linguists in the country they serve; often their tour of duty is not long enough to become experts in racial, economic and technical phases of the country. The Bus- sians are farsighted, though in a destructive sense: They groom agents years in advance of their assignments. Spain reports the disappearance of children, after the Civil War 1936-1939. They reappear as Communist espionage agents, with a native's command of language and appearance. 1 he following is a synopsis of Klausen's notes. As his ten- year espionage career was richly varied, his notes shed light on many phases of his work and supplement Sorge's own story. ". . . When you get to Japan, study the language, ft will be most necessary for your work." Such was the advice of a Major General attached to the Far Eastern Section of the IVth Bureau. "... I had many harrowing experiences with the Japanese police, and numerous hair's-breadth escapes. Often I was forced to improvise means of escape on the spur of the moment. I had received no special instructions from the Moscow authorities or advice from my comrades as to what methods I should employ to outwit the police, but I made a point of appearing to be a law-abiding citizen. . . "... I not only established the (commercial) Klausen Co., but 1 obtained a driver's license after submitting my photograph and going to the Metropolitan Police Board for fingerprinting, joined the German Club, and attended parties at the German Embassy. 1 was cheerful in the company of my Japanese friends, and whenever the police called, I received them warmly and was careful not to hurt their feelings. ". . . While adapting myself to this type of life, I was careful to elude suspecting eyes when visiting my comrades. . . ". . . ft is difficult to describe Sorge. He never once revealed his real character. But I may say that he was a true Communist and that nothing could make him give up his belief. He would kill his best friend if necessary, lor communism. . . ". . . He was a firm Communist but, on the other hand, he was a man who could not bear up under serious conditions. 1 say this since it appears that he told everything after his arrest. If at the time of his arrest he had remained a firm Communist, he would have held his tongue and not told everything. ". . . His treatment of me was not so bad, but he always treated me as a sort of errand boy since he had no one else to help him. His treatment of Voukelitch was not much different. ". . . Sorge treated Guenther Stein very well because Stein possessed a large fund of knowledge on political and economic matters and Sorge could use Stein to much advantage. He learned a lot from Stein and so he treated him well. His treatment of Ozaki was cordial because Ozaki was a very intelligent man. Since Sorge was well- informed about politics and economics, he was strict with Page 36 Ozaki and Miyagi and they couldn't very well bring in false information. Sorge gave both of them adequate living allowances. That is all I know about their relations with him. . ." 1 he news value of the Sorge story is self-evident, even more so its importance as a pattern of Soviet intelligent operation. In December, 1948, the Secretary of the Army had taken steps to clear portions of the story for release The element which intrigued MacArthur's intelligence research was the ultimate and dramatic recognition thW the story did not begin or end with Tokyo, that it was 0° accident that Sorge arrived in Shanghai first, and that hi' later operations, localized in Japan, were only a facet "J the general mosaic of Soviet and Comintern international strategy. The role of Shanghai, a veritable witch's cauldro" of international intrigue, a focal point in Communis' effort, becomes apparent in the records of the Sorge tria1 and collateral testimony. The American press was thoroughly interested. In th6 normal course of events, following the initial release. tW papers were waiting for further details, particularly tW release of documentary evidence, the confessions of tne principal defendants, participants, and eyewitnesses. C-2 Tokyo was prepared to furnish this material, but B*j call never came. Instead, a few days later, a shocked i'f incredulous Headquarters in Tokyo became aware of wo* amounted to a virtual repudiation of the Sorge Spy Rep0' by the very Washington authorities who had so oagci • negotiated for its release throughout an entire year. , Tlie \niiy Department's retraction was certain to cCJ off the eagerness of the press immediately. The ArmV public information division said flatly "that it was wtO"'" and in error in charging that Agnes Smedley, an Amerifl writer, was a Bussian spy." Agnes Smedley got space on the air. hired a well-kno^" attorney, and proceeded to "defend her lair name." It ^ a foregone conclusion that something would be done ■" the American Communist party. The implications of in*6* national conspiracy, in the Far East, were too overvvhe'"( tag. Silence would have been fatal for the of Sovi' penetration of the Orient, fn any event, the prestige American communism was at stake. 1 he psychological counterattack was cleverly manail''1 It was primarily directed at General MacArthur. f magic of MacArthur's name would automatically ins1 front space in the press. The fact that the original ^ejt was a Washington-directed affair was blandly overlook6:' Nor was there any point in suing me (Willough'1*I though the direct responsibility lor the preparation of ™ report, i.e., the substance of accusation, was obv iousb' a G-2 department. Agnes Smedley expressed her gratitude and appreCl( tion to the Army for "clearing her name and reputation , the outrageous and false charge." She called upon GeOjJ Mac Arthur "to waive his immunity and she would sue h1 for libel." I immediately issued a public broadcast- which I accepted suit with the deliberate- intent, of cOl,tSi of forcing the evidence into the open. From the hoU* ^ my broadcast, Smedley and her "mouthpiece" lapsed ®\ complete and cautious silence. Incidentally, John R0^" Facts Forum News, March, '^
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