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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
File 037
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 037. 1956-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 18, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/946.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-03). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 037. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/946

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 037, 1956-03, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 18, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/946.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date March 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 037
Transcript SHANGHAI CONSPIRACY 3orge's forecast is accurate. All this has come to pass, under the deteriorating influence of the Second World War. The Communist parties of France and Italy have grown enormously. Only Spain under General Franco was able to stem the Bed tide. ". . . Before the 1920s, the only theaters of operation in which the revolutionary labor movement and Soviet policy "'ere interested were Europe and a portion of America. "ery little attention was paid to the Far East. I, with a small group of others, believed that a transformation of «emendous consequence in the revolutionary labor move- Went and in Soviet foreign policy would be anticipated in juis new field in the Far East; that the security problem raced by the Soviet Union with respect to external friction :""1 probable attack would have to be reviewed and changed in line with the new role to be played by the ''ai' East; and. finally, that events in the Far East would °i necessity cause momentous reverberations in the great powers of Europe and the United States and might bring ''""ut a fundamental change in the existing balance of Power. . ." \".u'n. Sorge's prescience is uncanny. We remind the ."'•"ler ol an often quoted statement attributed to Lenin that the road to Paris was via Peiping" — At any rate, the ' "Wets lust no time to enter the China field. Concurrently v,th Sorge. other native agitators from Indochina and "doiiesia were being groomed for the jobs they have "l(«' acquired: Ho Shi Ming in Tonkin, the Communist Party iT, Indonesia and triumvirate Mao Tse-tung, Chu <;'' and \lnie. Sun Yat Sen in China. ' had heen ordered to gather information continuously "'K-erning the Nanking government's foreign policy. I •is most concerned with the attitudes adopted toward the K"W('t Union, Japan, England, and the United States. I ' '"led material from my Chinese members and from tl„ ! German and American consulates. During the Shang- ,'" 'neident of 1932, this policy of reliance on British and "'lican support was most interesting to observe. England and the United States made desperate efforts j. ,e'p the Nanking government resist Japan. As soon as 1 Shanghai Incident broke out, the various powers in- . ''y'd their military strength greatly, with the result that I ■ work in this field became extremely important and I '', to make more minute observations of the various pow- dispositions of military strength than in the past. I ^'illp-* ■ ?«**ed most of the "•"'> instructors." material myself or from German ,||( "('s report on his work in Shanghai is probably the di\ l "y'"'- from the viewpoint of American security. He « "M-d the activities in China of the top-hierarchy of the K,ii"<a" Communist party. Its first Secretary Genera] lr(J rowder was active here, in organizing a Communist folj ""' "1>a" Pacific Trade I Hi..n Secretariat." He was Hy jypd by the present Secretary General Eugene Den- tj| ' '"er well-known American Communists appear from ;„l(l<','" time, Haskell, Dolson, Hardy, Emerson, Smedley p,.(, "'"''national spies like Stein and Gerhardt Eisler. The 1,1, , "Cl' of American Communist leaders in China obvi- M,, j- ,"' a juridicial bearing on their later trial in Judge HiVl" 'S """'' and affects tllr validity of the Smith Act; 1 has branded Communists as foreign hirelings. ' 's p, obum News, March, 1956 ". . . In Japan, 1933-41, the membership of my espionage group determined to some extent the manner in which the work was divided. Klausen was unable to take part in the actual collection of intelligence and information, because his (radio) technical duties kept him fully occupied. Ozaki obtained information chiefly about political and economic affairs. Mivagi gathered economic and military data and took charge of the translation of all documents written in Japanese. Voukelitch collected news from foreign correspondents and French acquaintances and handled photography. "I myself gathered information from foreigners, principally Germans. 1 decided what portion of the information collected should be reported to Moscow by radio, what should be reserved for later delivery by courier in more detailed written form, and what should not be sent at all. I do not mean to say that I acted in arbitrary fashion; I used the information I received very conscientiously and alter careful deliberation. The process of selection often entailed hours of extra work. Tin- same was true of analyses of political and military situations. This ability to select material and present a general appraisal of a given development is a prerequisite for intelligence activity of genuine value, and can be acquired only through much serious and careful research. . . "• • • Unlike Berlin and Washington, Moscow knew China and Japan too well to be fooled easily. The Soviet level of knowledge of Far Eastern affairs was far above that of the American and German governments, and Moscow demanded that I send in systematic, soundly based, and carefully planned reports. I believe I can say that I succeeded in meeting the relatively high standard demanded by Moscow authorities. . . ". . . My studies did not interfere with my development as an expert intelligence agent. Aside from its immense practical value to my intelligence activities, my research on Japan was an absolute necessity as a cover. Without it, I could not have won the firm position I enjoyed at the German Embassy and among German journalists. It was because of my stature as a journalist that the German Foreign Office offered me a high official position with the embassy. . . ". . . At the time of my arrest, the discovery of between 800 and 1,000 books at my home proved a source of considerable annoyance to the police. Most of these works were on Japan. In building my library. I had collected every foreign language edition of an original Japanese work that I could lay my hands on, the best books that foreigners had written on Japan, and the best translations of basic Japanese works. I had translations made of various Japanese histories; I also had excerpt translations made regularly from a number of Japanese magazines. "... I did my best to familiarize myself with the vital problems confronting me in Japan and to dig deep into my work. My meetings with Ozaki and Mivagi constituted a vital phase of my research. ". . . Without this research and mv general cultural background, my secret mission would have been impossible; I could never have carried on for seven years in Japan unmolested. It was not skill or the examinations that 1 had to pass at the Moscow Intelligence School, but Page 35 V I -
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