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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
File 032
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 032. 1956-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/941.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-03). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 032. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/941

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 032, 1956-03, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/941.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date March 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 032
Transcript CONDENSATION OF channels. Dr. Richard Sorge and his group were exposed through DO errors of their own. Their operations were faultless; no one ever suspected them. Paradoxically it was a local Communist, Ito Ritsu, one of the four or five most influential leaders in the postwar Japanese Communist party, who betrayed them, motived bv malice and jealousy, though he had no real conception of what he was doing. Ito Ritsu, then aged 29, worked in the investigation department of the Tokyo branch of the South Manchurian Railway, the same organization which Ozaki was serving as special adviser. He was arrested in June. 1941, on suspicion of secret Communist activities. Interrogated by officers of the Tokyo Metropolitan Police Board. Ito made full confession, claimed to have erred by his Communist faith, and then began to implicate others. The Fifth Amendment was not valid in Japan. Among those on whom he informed was a woman, Kitabayasha Tomo, whom he had known as a former member of the American Communist party. He had noted that since her return to Japan, she had refused to have anv intercourse with Communists, and appeared to have become an apostate. Possibly calculating to enlist the aid ol his enemy, the police, for the punishment of a party traitor, Ito named this woman as a Communist and probable spy. It does not seem that Ito Ritsu had any real grounds to think of her as a spy, and certainly- he never imagined that she was a member of Sorge's ring. The police at once began hunting for Kitabayasha Tomo and put her on the watch-list to develop her contacts. Tliev did not arrest her until September 28, 1941, along with her innocent husband. Mrs. Kitabayasha does not seem to have been a very strong character. She soon confessed, and named Miyagi as her associate. Miyagi was arrested on October 10. From his attempted suicide and from evidence found in the house, the police realized that he was a member of an important spy ring. Much information was picked up from continuous interrogation of Miyagi, a frail, consumptive, who was not treated too gently. He talked freely. Much more was gathered by using his empty house as bait and picking up all callers. Ozaki was soon uncovered and by October 14, he too was behind bars. Since these men had [in excess of caution] not established an emergency warning system, and only met by prearrangement, none of them was able to warn anv- of the others. IVIax Klausen went to Sorge's home on October 15, 1941, to discuss a projected radio transmission to the USSR. Sorge was disturbed. Miyagi had arranged to meet him but had missed an appointment for the first time. Ozaki was supposed to come to a meeting on the 15th but he too had not appeared and both Klausen and Sorge were worried. Sorge showed Klausen the draft of a dispatch on the Japanese Army's advance in Indochina, followed by a request for relief. Klausen thought this message premature and returned it to Sorge unsent. Two days later Klausen again went to Sorge's house. where he found de Voukelitch who had also become disturbed by the silence of Miyagi and Ozaki. On his way Page 30 home, Klausen met an officer of the Metropolitan polic* named Aoyama. The encounter upset him greatly. "'' wondered if it were more than accidental, and debated '" his own mind whether to burn the documents then in '"■ possession and bury his transmitter in the garden. Finall)'' he decided to do nothing and went to bed. The next morning, while Max was still asleep, AoyaiH* and another police officer walked in and arrested hif1' While Aoyama was telling Max to get dressed and cofl* along, other officers had closed in on Dr. Richard Sort!e and Branko de Voukelitch. By October 18, 1941, all tl* principals of the Sorge ring were in jail and the organiz"' tion was completely disrupted. Sorge's arrest was a great shock to his Cerman friend* Ambassador Ott and the Gestapo chief, Colonel Josepj Meisinger. They could only believe that the Japanese 1'" committed another of the blunders for which they VV0J famous, and they worked hard to get their friend out fl jail. There was also a disturbing element: I by S0^ remote chance, good Nazi Sorge actually was a SoV spv. where did that leave two highly placed Nazi officii who had trusted and confided in him for so long? obstinate Japanese police adamant. Thev ins'5 that they had the principals of a most dangerous spy rl i Ott and Meisinger reported the arrest to Berlin, but tn to minimize their relations with Sorge. so that if ( Japanese police were right, their reputations would " be hurt too badly. Von Ribbentrop sharply demanded explanation from Ott; ultimately, he replaced him- Meanwhile, Gestapo-headquarters in Berlin turned J ° complete dossier on Surge from his earlier days " Germany, indicating his Soviet connections. MeisiDJ turned this over to the Japanese, to save his own P"''"',, skin. He was still German Gestapo representative in JaP)g, when Eisenhower accepted the German surrender in 1 p He was flown to Poland in the autumn of 1945, eharf! with commission of atrocities at Warsaw, where he hanged. The Japanese police records show that 35 persons * arrested in connection with the Sorge case. So man> . their prisoners talked freely that the police had no pr lem in getting a full picture. Having proved their '■ . they became concerned with deeper implications: / wanted to know more than the mere facts of how the SP had operated and what they had found out; thev "'"" ,a- to know what had motivated them, especially the Jap"' traitors. Although Surge attempted to maintain silence- • 1 was contemptuous of (Clausen's turning informant,fi^g five months had passed, even he came to talk freely ' seemingly, willingly. 1 he police discovered That Klati: dulled his disill traffic which Sorge was preparing In |i>' prosperity -^ enthusiasm for the Soviet cause. His 8r0]*J tusionment had made him reluctant to send the PJl him in ever ""''.fi ing volume. Until the autumn of 1940 he sent *-j| message. From then on he began to cut down and '"' ],i 1941 transmitted only about a third of the messa'-!''1"^- July, 1941, when Sorge gave him the call signal and *\J length of a new radio station with which he to c"1 municate in addition to the old one, Klausen failed v> I'vi is Forum News, March m It Kla
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