Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
File 029
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 029. 1956-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/938.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-03). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 029. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/938

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 029, 1956-03, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/938.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date March 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 029
Transcript SHANGHAI CONSPIRACY during his student days at the University of Zagreb. After two years, he went to the University of Paris to study law. Before completing the course he went to work for the Compagnie General d'F.lectrieite, met and married Edith, a Danish woman of whom we know little. In January, 1932, he formally became a Communist and a Soviet agent. The Soviets, however, seem equally able to use men as agents who either are not Party members at all — provided they are willing to make every sacrifice for the Party's Cause —or who hold Party cards on which the signatures are scarcely dry. The previous interests and convictions °f the man concerned, rather than formal Party allegiance, seem to determine his selection. Having received permission to take his wife with him, ne sent Edith to Denmark for a short course in physical Wucation to give her a legitimate occupation should she need a "cover" when frhey got abroad. As it turned out her "'< upation as a housewife was sufficient to disarm Japanese suspicion. Myagi described her as "a dull woman, Sood only for cover." They sailed from Marseilles on December 30, 19.32; landed at Yokohama on February 11, 1933; found a place at the Bunka Apartments in Ilongoku, Probably the best apartments in Tokyo. Since Sorge had n°t vet arrived, de Voukelitch had time to get started on n,s career as special correspondent ill Tokyo for the *reneh picture magazine La Vtte and for the Yugoslav da'ly Politico. If his was a long-term project, and Surge was in no hurry " Set started until his machine was functioning smoothly. ^e needed agents, a considerable net of them: adequate '"lio and courier communication; a darkroom; and good utside contacts. The German Embassy was his immediate '""et. Through Mrs. Ott, whom he had chanced to know Munich years before, he met her husband, a German "'itary attache in China, and began his campaign for LCc''l>tance at the German Embassy. Ott's transfer to °kyo was an accident — but a fortuitous one for Sorge. Miyagi Yotoku, in Los Angeles, was recruited by the '. aerican Communist rwtrtv and the Comintern. Mivatn cla erican Communist party and the Comintern. Miyagi ''Wis he never knew precisely for whom he was working. native of Okinawa, born in 1903, he was a Japanese who fa(l lived in the United States since 1919. He graduated ?** the San Diego Art School in 1925. There was nothing his record to present him as a heroic figure or even as Potentially dangerous spy. Perhaps that was why he was t ec'ted from the many Japanese Communists in Cali- , out as the Comintern's choice to meet Sorge's request r a Japanese assistant. Miyagi reached Tokvo in Octo- ber- 1933. (() Although they had yet to meet, all of Richard Sorge's th «e' a'°-es were now in Japan: Branko de Voukelitch, (. neutral" press contact man; Ozaki Hozumi, well- aff.nv" Japanese journalist and commentator on Chinese tli!"s' Miyagi Yotoku, inconspicuous Japanese artist; and ,, " radio «rw,.-.,I,.- "n- \7~~.i*. ** .ii.. "r>—i... i*." c—.»,. 0 -lo operator "Bruno Vendt," alias "Bernhardt." Sorge r ■y *d his own contacts within the ring to de Voukelitch, 1 jri Kl. Miyagi, and the radio operator, who was Max (m'|'"s<" alter 1935; and from the period 1936 to 1938 to *«!» r s,('"'- He met these people frequently at restau- iftj, '""I bars, or at his own home. For years these meet- ■' and disarming since three of the P. 1 "ere journalists with common professional interests. 4t ,, S I ortjm News, March, 1956 After 1940, when police surveillance became more alert, Sorge began meeting the men secretly. Some of the precautions observed by the group were as follows: All members must have a rational occupation as "cover." Members must have no traffic with Japanese Communists or (.'oniniunist sympathizers. The radio code must be altered with each sending; the transmitter moved after each operation. Each member must have a cover name; place names must be disguised in code. Documents must be destroyed after serving their purpose. Never must a Russian be admitted to the circle. Cultivate trust and confidence on the part of those you are using as informants in order to pump them. Contacts with foreigners are essential. Adaptability is a basic requirement for the man engaged in espionage work. Refrain carefully from careless talk and not reveal secrets to any outsider, even one's most trusted friend. Oorge observed: "Women are absolutely unfit for espionage work. They have no understanding of political and other affairs and I have never received satisfactory information from them. Since they were useless to me, I did not employ them in my group. Even upper class women have no comprehension of what has been said by their husbands and are, therefore, very poor sources of information. This does not apply merely to Japanese women; in my opinion, no woman in the world has the aptitude for espionage work, I might add that cultivation of intimate relations with married women for purposes of espionage will arouse the jealousy of their husbands, hence react to the detriment of the cause. In the final analysis, espionage operations must be performed by a man with a good education and a keen mind." Actually Sorge is inconsistent, in some respects. He cultivated the American writer Agnes Smedley, in China, and used her extensively in espionage nets in that country. Smedley became the "front woman" later on, in the effort of the American Communist party to discredit MacArthur, in 1949. Sorge early decided that "Bernhardt" was not suitable for the delicate Japanese assignment. In 19.35 Max Klausen, who had the rank of major in the Red Army, arrived in Japan to replace "Bernhardt" as secret radio operator for Sorge. Klausen was a heavy-set, coarse-featured German, a radio technician though not well educated and the last conceivable suspect as a successful agent of the Red Army. Klausen's ride always was in communications. He established a commercial firm with offices in Tokyo. The company made and sold printing presses for blueprints as well as fluorescent plates, and almost immediately began to make money. Among its customers were munition factories, the Japanese Army and the Japanese Navy. While Klausen was processing the Army's blueprints, Surge was getting finished copies, klausen reorganized his Page 27 V \\ /
File Name uhlib_1352973_v005_n003_029.jpg